Legume grains (Phaseolus vulgaris and Pisum sativum) of the Pacific Northwest as an alternative broiler feedstuff Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/4b29b840m

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  • Increasing commodity and fuel prices can be a deterrent to growing broilers in the Pacific Northwest. One of the most common protein components of the broiler ration is soybean meal derived from soybeans grown in the Midwestern United States. In an effort to reduce the reliance on this product, alternative local feedstuffs were examined. Three experiments were performed to identify the feasibility of including Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean) and Pisum sativum (field pea) in broiler rations. The first experiment assessed the 30% inclusion of three different raw beans, pinto, Great Northern white, and small red beans into broiler diets for 42 days. Pinto beans outperformed both white and red beans, but weight gain and feed efficiency of all three were significantly reduced when compared to the corn-soy based control diet. Experiment two compared the growth rates of broiler chicks fed diets containing either 30% heat-treated or 30% raw versions of the three bean cultivars for 21 days. Chick growth was improved by the heat treatment of Great Northern white beans; however, heat treatment demonstrated little or no impact on the birds fed pinto or small red beans. The final experiment assessed the general dietary inclusion of field peas and the alternative feeding practices of sprouting legume grains completely excluding imported soy products. Including field peas at 30% of the total ration did not inhibit broiler growth when compared to the corn-soy based control diet in the 42 day trial. In a 30% pea diet, sprouting 10% of those peas did not significantly alter chick growth when compared to a standard inclusion of 30% dried field peas; however, feed conversion was significantly improved. A 76% pea diet without soy products significantly reduced feed efficiency and bodyweight gain.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Julie Kurtz(julie.kurtz@oregonstate.edu) on 2009-08-31T15:41:12Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Thesis Draft 8 13 09 final.pdf: 375466 bytes, checksum: f88a4efbea610c2958570dac1b8d8fac (MD5)
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