Nutritional ecology of cervids in old-growth forests in Olympic National Park, Washington Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/4m90f089z

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • Nutritional ecology of unhunted and sympatric populations of Roosevelt elk, Cervus elaphus roosevelti, and Columbian black-tailed deer, Odocoileus hemionus columbianus, was investigated in old-growth forests of the Hoh Valley in Olympic National Park, Washington, from September 1979 to November 1981. Seasonal diets of both cervids generally were comprised of common forages; relative availabilities of other preferred forages minimized their contributions to the diet of either ungulate. Hemlock, swordfern, oxalis, and alder were the most common dietary components on an average annual basis. Levels of crude protein, dry matter digestibility and phosphorus in important forages varied with phenology, but seasonal trends were more pronounced for shrubs and grasses than forbs and trees. Dietary levels of those nutritional attributes for both elk and deer varied seasonally in the following ascending order: winter, fall, summer, spring. Protein and phosphorus appeared to be adequate in diets, but low in vitro digestibilities suggested that digestible energy may be limited. Levels of sodium and selenium were low in most forages and suggested that dietary levels also were low. No significant differences in seasonal diet quality were demonstrated between deer and elk. Fecal nitrogen of both cervids was correlated with dietary protein and provided an index to seasonal changes in nitrogen intake. Sympatry of elk and deer was typified by 1) a high degree of dietary overlap, 2) diets that seemed to afford little opportunity for partitioning plant parts, 3) a similar pattern of food acquisition in major foresttypes, and 4) heavy use of the forage base to the point of restricting distributions of preferred forages and influencing the physiognomy of the shrub layer in some forest communities. Those observations suggested that one cervid should competitively exclude the other. It was speculated that sympatry was enhanced by the spatial heterogeneity of the old-growth forest, in that large numbers of downed trees created areas only accessible to and used by deer. Cervids probably were limited by undernutrition and low reproduction, both consequences of maximum density and theoretically low forage availability and quality.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Committee Member
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Peer Reviewed
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome) using ScandAll PRO 1.8.1 on a Fi-6670 in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-07-31T21:04:02Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 LeslieDavidM1983.pdf: 2915862 bytes, checksum: 0780bd604249a0fbe4e69a1ad89a64b4 (MD5) Previous issue date: 1982-10-12
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-07-29T18:57:37Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 LeslieDavidM1983.pdf: 2915862 bytes, checksum: 0780bd604249a0fbe4e69a1ad89a64b4 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-07-31T21:04:02Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 LeslieDavidM1983.pdf: 2915862 bytes, checksum: 0780bd604249a0fbe4e69a1ad89a64b4 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Katy Davis (kdscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2013-07-29T18:39:47Z No. of bitstreams: 1 LeslieDavidM1983.pdf: 2915862 bytes, checksum: 0780bd604249a0fbe4e69a1ad89a64b4 (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Last modified

Downloadable Content

Download PDF

Items