A comparative study of academic success and other selected characteristics of financial aid and non-financial aid recipients at Winona State College Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/4t64gq70d

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  • The purpose of this study was to compare and evaluate personal attitudes and perceptions, educational and vocational plans, activities and satisfaction among students of two basic groups selected for the study: a) financial aid recipients, b) non-financial aid recipients. Subgroups in each category consisted of over-achievers and under-achievers. Over-achievers were designated as those individuals whose grade point was .15 or more above their predicted grade point average. Under-achievers were designated as those individuals whose grade point average was .15 or more below their predicted grade point average. The data were gathered from the student's files in the Office for Student Affairs, Registrar's Office and from administration of the College Student Questionnaire, Part Two (CSQ). The data were subjected to statistical analysis to determine the validity of the following hypotheses: a) there is no significant difference in the proportions of students receiving financial aid and those not receiving financial aid whose achieved grade point averages are greater than or less than their predicted grade point average; b) there is no significant difference among the four groups used in the study on any of the eleven areas measured by the CSQ. The samples used in testing hypothesis one consisted of 159 financial aid recipients and 267 non-financial aid recipients. A statistical analysis was conducted comparing the two groups using the Chi square test of significance to determine if any significant difference existed in relation to academic achievement. Hypothesis one was rejected at the five percent level of confidence. Students receiving financial aid were performing academically better than the non-financial aid students. The samples for testing the other hypotheses consisted of four groups of students: 1) financial aid over-achievers - 55 students; 2) financial aid under-achievers - 52 students; 3) non-financial aid over-achievers - 53 students; 4) non-financial aid under-achievers - 53 students. Between the financial aid over-achievers and financial aid under-achievers, a significant difference was found at the one percent level of confidence in the area of study habits favoring the financial aid over-achiever. A significant difference favoring the financial aid under-achiever was found in the area of liberalism at the five percent level of confidence. A significant difference was found between non-financial aid over-achievers and under-achievers in the area of satisfaction with the faculty and administration at the five percent level of confidence favoring the non-financial aid over-achievers. A significant difference between financial aid over-achievers and non-financial aid over-achievers favoring the financial aid overachievers was found in the area of family independence at the one percent level of confidence. Significant differences between financial aid under-achievers and non-financial aid under-achievers were found at the one percent level of confidence in the areas of satisfaction with the faculty and administration and at the five percent level in the areas of family independence, extra-curricular involvement and cultural sophistication favoring the financial aid under-achiever. Analysis of the demographic data indicated that financial aid over-achievers were significantly different in age: the over-achievers were younger. There was also a significant difference in place of residence: the majority of over-achievers lived in the college dormitories, while the majority of under-achievers lived in off campus housing. There was a significant difference in achievement for students working more than 15 hours per week: more under-achievers than over-achievers were working 15 hours or more per week. There was no significant difference in achievement between financial aid and non-financial aid subgroups for students working up to 15 hours per week.
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