An Oregonian Jarabe : Danza Folklórica and Mexicana Mothers Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/4t64gs92v

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • Acculturative stress can be associated with increased conflicts between Latino parents and adolescent youth, and have negative effects on Latino immigrant parents' psychosocial functioning and parenting practices. Yet, the potentially deleterious effects of acculturative stress on Latino immigrant parents' psychosocial functioning and parenting practices may be mitigated through positive acculturative strategies, such as participating in forms of cultural expression that reinforce Latino parents' and children's cultural identity. The study employed a qualitative research approach to examine the meaning that mexicana and Mexican American mothers give to their children's participation in the culturally affirming activity of folkloric Mexican dance. This study was informed by hybridity theory. Hybridity theory has been applied in cultural studies when tending to issues of the reconfigurations of cultural practices and identities to adapt to new and changing cultural, historical, and political contexts. This study used individual and focus group interviews with an intensive sample and a comparison sample of women whose children participated in folkloric Mexican dance groups from three communities in Oregon. Inductive analysis of the interview data revealed that the meaning Mexican and Mexican American women ascribed to their and their children's participation in folkloric Mexican dance groups can be organized around three key themes that were supportive of their mothering practices: desenvolverse (the process of the children's unfolding), convivencia (living in the company of others; connection), and, most importantly, continuity in aspects of the mothers' Mexican cultural identity that gets carried forward in their children's cultural identity development. Policies designed to support Mexican and Mexican American mothers and families by way of implementing and supporting groups where culturally affirming activities are discussed. Recommendations for future studies on participation in culturally affirming activities as a buffer to acculturative stress are included.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Committee Member
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Keyword
Subject
Rights Statement
Peer Reviewed
Language
Replaces

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Last modified

Downloadable Content

Download PDF

Items