Optimizing the performance of gypsum wall board in wood frame shear walls Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/5m60qv64c

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  • The overall goal of this project was to design a wood frame shear wall that could withstand greater displacement before damage occurred to the Gypsum Wall Board (GWB). More specifically, the objectives of the study were: (1) to evaluate damage to the GWB in alternative shear wall designs at 1%, 2% and 3% drift levels and compare these results to current performance-based design standards, (2) to evaluate quantitatively the relative displacement between the GWB and the wood frame under monotonic loading and (3) to evaluate the value of alternative shear wall designs considering damage sustained from design drift levels. A total of 14 shear walls consisting of seven different designs with two walls built per design were tested to failure. Six of these walls had 1105 mm x 610 mm window openings and eight did not. All shear walls were 2440 mm x 2440 mm in size and built from 38 mm x 89 mm Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) studs at 610 mm on center (o. c.). The seven shear wall designs tested included two control designs based on the minimum 2009 International Residential Code requirements. One control design included a window opening and another did not. The SEPSTUD wall design included a larger screw to GWB edge distance, while the 3INNAIL design included a closer OSB nail spacing. The 2OSBWIN and 2OSB wall designs, respectively, with and without a window opening, included Oriented Strand Board (OSB) panels attached to both sides of the wood frame and the GWB attached on top of the OSB. The 4PNLWIN design attached the GWB as four different panels around the window opening, instead of two panels. Shear wall test behavior generally agreed with the ASCE/SEI 41-06 performance-based drift criteria. 1% drift occurred between 57-80% of total wall capacity, 2% drift occurred between 84-97% of wall capacity and 3% drift occurred between 97-100% of wall capacity. The results of the visual failure comparison indicated that little damage was observed in the GWB for walls loaded to the NDS allowable strength. The results of the shear wall visual failure comparison indicated that all innovative shear wall designs outperformed the control designs at 1% drift. This was because less GWB damage was observed in the innovative shear wall designs. At 2% and 3% drift, the 4PNLWIN and SEPSTUD designs performed worse than the control. The 3INNAIL design performed slightly better, and the 2OSB and 2OSBWIN designs performed superior to the control designs at 2% and 3% drift. The greater performance of all these designs can be attributed to the increase in strength and stiffness of these shear walls. However, superior performance of the 2OSB and 2OSBWIN designs was due to the similar stiffness of both sides of the shear wall, resulting in equal load sharing and less damage to the GWB. Shear walls with magnitudes of the relative displacement vectors above the visual failure limit of 3 mm exhibited inferior GWB performance, which is consistent with the visual failure results. A shear wall value comparison indicated that the 3INNAIL, 2OSB and 2OSBWIN designs all exhibited a more efficient use of shear wall materials at 1% and 2% drift than the control designs. However, when considering a design earthquake drift level, 2OSB and 2OSBWIN designs demonstrate the most efficient use of shear wall materials.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Julie Kurtz(julie.kurtz@oregonstate.edu) on 2010-03-29T16:11:15Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Thesis Final Draft.pdf: 5433699 bytes, checksum: a5212211a5497ce549ef0bb855b3868d (MD5)
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