A toolbox for sustaining working waterfronts : Assessing applications in Newport, Oregon Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/6108vg580

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  • Working waterfronts across the nation are under pressure. Land use priorities of local governments are changing in response to population growth, new economic pressures, and shifting policy and politics. In Oregon, the decline of fisheries and timber in economic importance followed by the growth of tourism and retirement services has introduced new challenges for traditional water-dependent activities and land uses. The Community Seafood Initiative and Seafood Consumer Center, in partnership with the Coastal Oregon Marine Experiment Station and Oregon State University, are leading a Pacific Northwest project to identify tools and strategies to sustain working waterfronts. Developing a 21st Century Toolbox is a main component of the research that will support community-specific engagement strategies. Toolbox frameworks developed in previous research for seaport development and waterfront revitalization are adapted to better address sustaining working waterfronts. Based on its prominence as a commercial fishing port and local interest in supporting this industry, the use of the toolbox in Newport, Oregon is investigated. Relevant tools and strategies are identified from the existing waterfront toolbox and modified and expanded into a “toolbox for working waterfronts.” Current applications of strategies to sustain the working waterfront are addressed based on a series of criteria noted in the literature for good processes concerning waterfronts. These criteria are adopted for a potential Model Working Waterfront Program (MWWP) and used to assess Newport in comparison to other working waterfront communities in the United States. Findings indicate that the toolbox is continually evolving and Newport may be underutilizing some of the tools identified for sustaining working waterfronts as compared to other waterfront communities and the criteria for a MWWP. Conclusions on the present status of tool utilization in Oregon and Newport are presented, key areas of improvement are suggested, and recommendations are offered to sustain the state’s working waterfronts.
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