Does implementing a behavioral safety process decrease injuries and their severity? Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/6395wb36z

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  • The purpose of this study was to determine if the implementation of a Behavioral Safety process in a high tech worksite decreases injuries and their severity. The study also sought to determine interest and participation in the corporate Behavioral Safety process. Past injury data were collected and analyzed from corporate and site-specific sources to compare injury rates of sites that had implemented the Behavioral Safety processes to sites that did not implement the process. A Behavioral Safety survey was administered to 1569 employees to determine the level of interest and perceptions of the Behavioral Safety Observation and Feedback (BSOF) process at Corvallis. The survey data was gathered using Websurveyor software. No discernable differences in OSHA Recordable Case Rate (OCR) and Lost Workday Case Rate (LWCR) were noted for sites that had implemented BSOF processes when compared to those that had not implemented the process. Behavioral Safety sites, however, showed decreases in the Lost Workday Rates (LWR), whereas the Non-Behavioral Safety sites showed increases in the LWR, suggesting that more severe injuries have declined at BSOF sites. The results showed that there was a decrease in the number of injuries in the Corvallis high-risk job grouping from the period of FY'98 to FY'01. Individuals in this job class operate manufacturing equipment, maintain equipment, work in labs, or clean room environments. Similarly, there was an increase in the number of injuries in the medium and low-risk job groupings. These results suggest that the respondents in higher-risk areas (e.g. operators) were more likely to agree that there is a need to have a Behavioral Safety Process in place and functioning. In lower-risk areas (e.g. office workers), the respondents were less likely to agree that participation in a Behavioral Safety process is needed. Individuals who worked in manufacturing areas demonstrated more support for the process than did individuals in office environments. Additionally, in areas where management support was present, more employee support was visible. The study showed an overall low level of interest in the process among participants, and a lower level of interest by non-participants. Most would prefer to use a process other than BSOF to improve personal behavior. Despite the lack of interest in BSOF by participants, the respondents only partially supported a voluntary process and they indicated increased safety awareness at work and at home. This included increased recognition of safe behaviors in the work area, and an improved ability to give and receive feedback to others.
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