The effects of various calcium and pectin treatments on canned Elberta peaches Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/6682x6182

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  • Experiments were conducted to establish whether or not calcium and pectin treatments might improve the typically ragged appearance of canned freestone peaches without impairing other desirable characteristics. and thereby make freestone varieties more acceptable for canning. Accordingly, Elberta peaches were subjected to three types of prepacking treatments, dipping for 30 minutes in 0.00%, 0.05%, 0.10% and 0.50% calcium in the form of calcium lactate and calcium chloride, application of 0%, 1% and 3% low-methoxyl pectin applied as a ten-minute dip and in the syrup along with 0.00% and 0.05% calcium, also as a ten-minute dip, and lastly treatments with 0.00%, 0.02% and 0.03% pectin esterase combined with 0.00%, 0.05%, and 0.10% calcium levels in a 30-minute dip. The peaches were then canned and stored for six months. To determine the effects of the treatments the peaches were evaluated organoleptically for appearance, flavor, and texture and objective measurements of density, soluble solids, shearing strength and sediment in the syrup were made. Although treatments of this nature have proven effective for other fruits and frozen peaches, no outstanding improvement was noted in this project. Pectin esterase at the 0.02% and 0.04% levels, however, did improve appearance slightly and also reduced the amount of sediment in the syrup without impairment of the flavor. Calcium treatment alone did not affect appearance, but did reduce sediment and increase shearing strength although in amounts over 0.05% calcium was detrimental to flavor with calcium chloride being the worst offender. Pectin treatment was actually harmful to both appearance and flavor, probably because of the occurrence of some gellation in several treatments. No differences were noted for texture and although differences in soluble solids and density were observed, they were of small magnitudes.
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