A quantitative analysis of log volume concepts and product derivatives Public Deposited

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  • One of the most important challenges facing foresters is the development of a raw material measurement system designed to give a complete inventory of log volume and to assist in planning the complete management of log production. This paper introduces a concept of production analysis in terms of solid fiber content. The basis for the development of this concept is the measurement of logs and log production in terms of cubic feet. Total raw material accountability is maintained throughout the manufacturing process. A mill study was undertaken to compare the results of this type of analysis with results obtained by traditional analytical methods. It was found that raw material management by this analysis can be useful in measuring the effectiveness of a production design. This analysis has further usefulness in projecting the results of proposed changes in production design. The mill study was undertaken with the log input, primary lumber products, and sawmill residuals measured in terms of cubic feet of wood fiber. This study is referred to as treatment A in this paper. The mill study data were used to project two changes in sawing practices, treatments B and C, and the expected results are presented. The 471 logs in the study had a volume of 172,850 board feet gross, and 143,490 board feet net, Scribner scale. The logs had a volume of 24, 574 cubic feet on the basis of Smalian's cubic foot rule. The volumes in the study were assigned dollar values on the basis of grade and projected on the basis of an annual cut of 30 million board feet, assuming the same variables encountered in the test material. By using the values assigned to the products in Treatment A, the total value of products was $2,802,481, based on the assumed 30 million board feet cutting schedule. The yearly product value for Treatment B was $175,769 more than Treatment A, and the yearly product value for Treatment C was $302,632 more than Treatment A. It is emphasized that any comparison of other situations with those defined in this paper must be carefully qualified. A review of present and past log measurement systems includes a discussion of the British Hoppus Foot, and the shaku and koku units of measure used in Japan. Various cubic foot rules discussed include Newton's formula, Huber, Smalian, Rapraeger and Sorensen. The more common board foot rules include Scribner, Scribner Decimal C, Spaulding, British Columbia rule, International 1/4-inch and 1/8-inch rules, Brereton, and Doyle log rules. Measurement by displacement and weight is discussed. Efforts in comparing the economics of different measurement methods are reported. The development of log residual products during manufacture is discussed. These present both problems in terms of disposal and opportunities for additional economic development. A concerted effort is needed to design mensurational techniques that will act as incentives toward the most complete and profitable utilization of our forest resource. Toward this end it is suggested that those in the field of forest mensuration coordinate their efforts with the research and utilization fields toward a complete understanding of the complex problem of wood measurement. This paper concludes that cubic analysis of log input and production outflow can better serve the needs of the forest products industry.
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