Fiber artists of Oregon Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/6m311s86d

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  • The objectives of this study were: 1. To identify factors which contribute to the success of a fiber artist in Oregon, including skills or knowledge gained from training or experience. 2. To draw up recommendations for use by colleges and universities to facilitate the evaluation of programs designed to train successful artists. 3. To provide fiber artists with a summary of general information regarding their Oregon peers. The investigator interviewed ninety-five fiber artists from twentysix cities and towns in Oregon; eighty-eight artists were females and seven were males. A measure of success was devised and used to rate the artists. The Investigator's Rating of Success and the artists' own ratings of success were compared and correlated with several other variables. No significant relationship was found between scores on the Investigator's Rating of Success and the Self Rating of Success. Significant relationships were found between the Investigator's Rating of Success scores and the number of years doing work, the hobbyist/ professional self rating, and the number of hours doing work each week. The Self Rating of Success scores were significantly related with the hobbyist/professional self ratings. T-tests were used to assess differences in the Investigator's Rating of Success scores and in the Self Rating of Success scores of artists divided according to techniques used, articles produced, sales outlets, source of commissions, training, and sex. Significant differences were found in the Investigator's Rating of Success scores of artists who do/do not (a) use weaving techniques, (b) use techniques other than weaving, and (c) use construction techniques. Significant differences were found in the Self Rating of Success scores of artists who do/do not use surface embellishment techniques. The artists were asked to rate a list of skills or knowledge according to the extent to which they contributed to success as an artist, and to indicate where each could best be learned. The skills which were rated the highest were design ability and expertise in technique(s). Other skills which were rated very high were related to exhibiting work. Income and money management skills were rated relatively high. How to obtain grants, and how to set up a studio were skills whose high, medium, and low ratings were almost equally distributed. Skills which were rated relatively low in contribution to success were: ability to teach, ability to write, and ability to lecture. Skills which the artists indicated could best be learned through training or mostly through training were use of contracts, how to obtain grants, how to put portfolio together and getting good photos of your work. Skills which the artists indicated could best be learned through both training and experience were ability to write, expertise in technique(s), design ability, ability to teach, ability to lecture, and management of income. Skills which the artists indicated could best be learned through experience, or mostly through experience, include how to exhibit, how to price artwork, how to obtain commissions, organization of work, how to set up a studio, where to exhibit and obtaining of materials at reasonable cost. Keeping good records of income and expenses was the only skill whose ratings were evenly divided among the five categories of where each skill could best be learned. Several recommendations, based upon the artists ratings of the factors which contribute to success, were drawn up for the use of colleges and universities to facilitate the evaluation of programs designed to train fiber artists. Suggestions for further study were made. A summary of the thesis was prepared and sent to the participating artists.
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