Essential elementary school physical education facilities as determined by a national survey and a comparison to the existing facilities in Oregon Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/6q182n624

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  • Purpose This study compared existing Oregon elementary school physical education facilities and equipment with those facilities and equipment items perceived to be essential for a quality physical education program by nationally selected physical education specialists. Procedures A survey form was mailed to 110 national educators proposed by state directors of physical education as specialists in elementary school physical education facilities and equipment. Responses were received from 89 (81 percent) of these specialists. The survey form contained 137 items divided into six categories of the instructional complex: (1) community school area, (2) outdoor equipment and surfacing material, (3) outdoor all-weather courts and surface areas, (4) outdoor field areas, (5) dressing-shower-locker areas, and (6) indoor instruction area, courts and equipment. The Oregon survey form contained the items checked as essential by 50 percent or more of the national jury. The Oregon survey form was mailed to 348 elementary school principals in Oregon requesting indication whether the items were now provided in their schools. From the 348 schools, 329 principals (94.5 percent) returned the completed survey form. Summary and Conclusions The national jury selected 41 of the 137 items included in the survey as being essential for a quality elementary school physical education program. On the basis of the six areas used from the national survey, the following data was obtained: (1) In the Community School Area, 24 percent of the Oregon elementary schools provide accessible toilet facilities. (2) In the Outdoor Equipment Area, 75 percent or more of the Oregon elementary schools provide climbing apparatus (94%), horizontal ladders (80%), and horizontal bars (75%). Less than 50 percent of the Oregon elementary schools included the remaining five items in the area: balance beams (13%), creative apparatus (33%), separate primary area (42%), and interlocking rubber padding (4%). (3) In the Outdoor All-weather Courts Area, 85 percent or more of the Oregon elementary schools provide low organization game areas (89%), tetherball areas (95%), and asphalt (blacktop) surface for courts (87%). Less than 50 percent of the Oregon elementary schools provide volleyball courts (42%). (4) In the Outdoor Field Area, 68 percent of the Oregon elementary schools provide one football- soccer field space 160' x 3601, and 91 percent provide permanent softball backstops. (5) In the Dressing-Shower-Locker Areas, 50 percent or more of the Oregon elementary schools provide a separate dressing room for both boys and girls (62%), lockers (51%), toilet facilities in the dressing room (66%), and separate shower rooms for both boys and girls (50%). Less than 50 percent of the Oregon elementary schools are providing instructor's office in the dressing area (39%), toilet facilities in instructor's office (21%), shower head at child's height (36%), and separate instructor's shower (6%). (6) In the Indoor Instructional Areas, 54 percent or more of the Oregon elementary schools provide separate gymnasium areas (78%), padded walls behind basketball backboards (54%), gymnasium ceiling height 22' (74%), basketball courts (88%), volleyball courts (91%), game circles and lines (75%), tumbling area (65%), balance beams (66%), basketball backboards (89%), climbing ropes (84%), horizontal bars (64%), tumbling mats (92%), and net standards (70%). Less than 50 percent of the Oregon elementary schools provide gymnasium dividers (4%), accoustical treatment in gymnasium (49%), gymnasium size 70' x 100' (32%), adjustable basketball backboards (10%), horizontal ladders (37%), and vaulting box (24%). Of the 41 facility and equipment items specified as essential for a quality physical education program in elementary schools by the national jury, the publication, Standards for Elementary Schools in Oregon, lists only 22 of the 41 items. Since the 1959 Oregon standards do not fit the present physical education curricular structure, there is a need to create up-to-date facility and equipment standards for improved physical education programs in elementary schools.
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