The Second Chance Program : A Participatory Research with Formerly Incarcerated Community College Students Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/6w924f81s

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  • Approximately 600,000 individuals will be eventually released from the prison system and millions will be released from jails across the United States each year (Mukamal et al., 2015). Some of these individuals will make their way to a local community college to make a better life for themselves. There is a lack of student support services specifically designed for this population at the community college level. The Second Chance Program (SCP) at City College of San Francisco attempts to meet some of the unique needs of this specific student population. The SCP is designed to serve approximately 100-150 formerly incarcerated students per academic year by providing a variety of support services for academic success (Completion of a certificate, Associates degree, and/or transfer to a four-year university). The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the impact the Second Chance Program had on six participants. These participants expressed academic goals for attending City College of San Francisco. I also engaged these participants in reflecting on the components of professional practice aimed at enhancing student support services to formerly incarcerated students at the community college level. This study uses a participatory action research method guided by Friere’s emancipatory philosophy and literacy campaign for farm workers in Brazil to assess the impact (if any) of the SCP in supporting the participants as they were pursuing their academic goals. I engaged the participants in two sets of individual dialogues. The first set of dialogues was to identify common themes across their experiences using SCP services. I specifically asked them to link challenges, barriers, and successes to their backgrounds of incarceration. The intent of the second set of dialogues was to elaborate on common themes identified in the first dialog and to critically reflect on their experiences at SCP with the intent of suggesting improvements in support services specifically designed for formerly incarcerated students at City College of San Francisco. These six individual accounts of SCP experiences identified the following common themes that they connected to their backgrounds that led to significant and protracted involvement with the criminal justice system. Theme One: The affects of dehumanization from the prison system. The participants linked this theme to experiencing physical and mental abuse in the prison, which caused fear, anger, and negative feelings, which sometimes manifested in negative behaviors. It was important for the participants to reconcile some of these issues through their participation in the SCP. Theme Two: Feelings of low-self esteem and self-worth. The participants connected this theme with the lack of preparation to successfully live once released from justice system and the importance of participating in different components of the SCP to feel a sense of community and to increase their self-worth to assist in completing their academic goals.
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  • description.provenance : Submitted by James Macale (macalej@oregonstate.edu) on 2016-07-24T02:41:42ZNo. of bitstreams: 2license_rdf: 1223 bytes, checksum: d127a3413712d6c6e962d5d436c463fc (MD5)MacaleJamesR2016.pdf: 4794914 bytes, checksum: 2b5760a1e24f706aa15b37df458fde24 (MD5)
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