Influence, techniques, and therapeutic change : a study of the relative efficacy of the common components in psychotherapy Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/6w924g080

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  • This study examines the relative efficacies of the specific and non-specific factors in psychotherapy. Psychotherapy is conceptualized as having three common components: the problem component whose essence is low self-esteem; the interactional component which induces change through social influence; and the treatment component which elicits change through therapeutic techniques. The relative efficacy of each of these two change components - influence (nonspecific factor) and therapeutic techniques (specific factor) - is the central issue of the study. Four groups, each of 20 subjects, were matched according to their low levels of self-esteem. Each group was administered a different treatment in three, one-hour sessions over a period of two weeks, designed to enhance self-esteem. The four treatments involved: 1. An emphasis on techniques - cognitive behavior - with social influence minimized through pre-session inductions; 2. An emphasis on social influence with no "usual" therapeutic techniques other than talk; 3. An emphasis on both therapeutic techniques - cognitive- behavior and social influence maximized through pre-session inductions; and 4. A no-treatment control group. Social influence induction scales indicated that pre-session inductions successfully maximized and minimized conditions of influence. Post-treatment interview measures indicated that the "full-therapy" - with both techniques and influence maximized -was most effective. However, the therapies with maximized social influence obtained significantly h1gher degrees of acceptance of their therapy, and elicited significantly greater enhancement of self-esteem, than did either the maximized technique, minimized influence therapy, or the no-treatment, control group. The therapy with minimized social influence showed no significant difference in its levels of acceptance, or in its enhancement of self-esteem, from the control group. These findings are interpreted to support the interactional view of psychotherapy; seeing therapeutic change as an influence process, and the therapeutic techniques as a means of further maximizing that influence. A case is made for a re-emphasis in psychotherapy on the interactional dynamics from a social psychological viewpoint.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-04-17T15:12:57Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 LynaghIanLawrence1982.pdf: 6562730 bytes, checksum: a55d4f45f680ed5682e82575c46d2dc2 (MD5)
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  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-04-18T19:13:48Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 LynaghIanLawrence1982.pdf: 6562730 bytes, checksum: a55d4f45f680ed5682e82575c46d2dc2 (MD5) Previous issue date: 1982-02-01

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