Development and control of benomyl-tolerant Botrytis cinerea strains on snap beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/7m01bp98v

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  • Benomyl-tolerant Botrytis cinerea was found in snap bean fields throughout the Willamette Valley while no tolerant isolates of Whetzelinia sclerotiorum were detected. Thirty-five benomyl-tolerant isolates of B. cinerea had slower radial growth rates than eighteen benomyl-sensitive isolates. Sporulation of an aggressive tolerant isolate was not stimulated when grown on benomyl-treated leaves. The sporulation of benomyl-tolerant strains used to inoculate field plots was less than sensitive isolates. There was a decline in the number of benomyl-tolerant B. cinerea lesions in plots not sprayed with benomyl. Development of a population with a high percentage of benomyl-tolerant B. cinerea occurred within four weeks in benomyl sprayed field plots regardless of the initial level of benomyltolerant individuals. The combination of captan, dichloran, and chlorothalonil with benomyl did not retard the development of a benomyl tolerant B. cinerea population. A benomyl-chlorothalonil combination, captan alone, dichloran alone, or chlorothalonil alone controlled gray mold. The incidence of gray mold was greater in plots sprayed only with benomyl than unsprayed plots. White mold was controlled by benomyl alone or in combination with captan, dichloran, or chlorothalonil while captan, dichloran, and chlorothalonil applied alone were not as effective. Benomyl-chlorothalonil combinations offer the most effective control of both diseases. Thiophanate methyl applied alone controlled white mold but not gray mold. Thiophanate methyl in combination with captan, dichloran, and chlorothalonil controlled gray mold. In a test of experimental fungicides, BAS35204F (structure confidential) provided the best control of white mold on snap beans. Botran applied to the base of bean plants was superior to topical applications applied at the same time and comparable to the best fungicide treatments.
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