A comparison of freshmen attending selected Oregon community colleges and Oregon State University in terms of interests, values, and manifest needs Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/7m01bq273

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  • The primary purpose of this study was to determine whether there were significant differences between Oregon community college collegiate freshmen and Oregon State University freshmen in terms of interest, values, and manifest needs. The study was limited to a representative sample of the freshman population in the lower-division collegiate program at three selected Oregon community colleges and to a representative sample of Oregon State University. The Strong Vocational Interest Blank for Men, the Allport-Vernon-Lindzey Study of Values, the Edwards Personal Preference Schedule, and a Personal Data Schedule were administered to 499 first-term male and female freshmen who were enrolled at these institutions for the fall term of 1963. The responses of the freshmen on the psychological tests were treated statistically by analysis of variance, and the responses on the Personal Data Schedule were converted to percentages and analyzed using the t-test. Significant differences were evident among the responses of the Oregon State University and community college males and females on the Personal Data Schedule. There were 32 items that differentiated between the community college and Oregon State University males at the 1 percent level and six items at the 5 percent level. There were 28 items that differentiated between the community college females at the 1 percent level and four that differentiated at the 5 percent level. On the Study of Values, Oregon State University males showed a higher mean score on the Theoretical scale than did the community college males. On the Social scale the community college males had a higher mean score than that of the Oregon State University males. Females at Oregon State University showed a higher mean score on the Economic scale than did the community college females, while the community college females had a higher mean score on the Religious scale than did the females at Oregon State University. There were many significant differences between the interests of Oregon State University males and community college males. Males at Oregon State University had substantially higher interest scores on the Strong Vocational Interest Inventory than did the community college males in Groups I and II, while community college males had considerably higher interest scores than did Oregon State University males in Groups VIII and IX. None of the scores on the occupational scales yielded significant differences among the mean scores of females attending Oregon State University and the community college females. Scores on the non-occupational scales, the Specialization Level and Occupational Level, differentiated between Oregon State University and community college males. The Oregon State University males scored higher than the community college males on both of these scales. The Occupational Level scale differentiated between Oregon State University and community college females and the Oregon State University females obtained the higher mean score. The least amount of difference between the mean occupational scores of the community college males and the mean occupational scores of Oregon State University males in the various major schools was found in the scores of the humanities majors when the miscellaneous category was excluded from the comparison. The greatest discrepancy in these occupational scores was found in the responses of males in engineering and science. The scores of the Oregon State University females in education most closely resembled the scores of the community college females, and the occupational scores of females that were least like the scores of community college females were those of the females in business and technology. Responses on the Study of Values and the Strong Vocational Interest Inventory indicated marked differences with respect to population characteristics in interests and values of freshmen attending community colleges and of freshmen attending Oregon State University. However, the responses on the Edwards Personal Preference Schedule show no evidence of differences among the personality characteristics of the freshmen.
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