Oil sprays to prevent the spread of bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) by aphids Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/7p88cm10d

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  • The influence of oil sprays on the field spread of the aphid-borne bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) in bean was studied in 1972 and 1973. Oil sprays failed to significantly reduce virus spread in the 1972 BYMV experiment. However, the data did suggest that the efficiency of the oil sprays could be greatly improved by timing the applications to periods of peak aphid activity. Several factors were identified which could have contributed to the failure of oil sprays to reduce the incidence of BYMV in 1972. An excessive time lag between bean emergence and the first oil application resulted in a considerable amount of virus spread within all of the plots before any oil sprays were applied. In addition, some of the treatments were subject to a disproportionate number of the dispersing aphid population which resulted in non-uniform virus spread throughout the study area. And all treatments were exposed for an excessive length of time to the gladioli or primary virus reservoir. As a result, the oil sprayed areas were subject to extreme pressure from the secondary and primary virus reservoirs. Results of the 1973 BYMV field experiment clearly indicate that oil sprays can protect bean plants against spread of BYMV under field conditions. A number of changes in the experimental design were responsible for the overall success of the 1973 experiment. The time lag between bean emergence and the first oil application was eliminated. This change prevented an excessive amount of virus spread early in the season, thus eliminating the high, non-differential virus spread that results when there is a lack of virus protection early in the season. And the exposure period of beans to the gladioli, primary virus source, was substantially reduced so that oil sprays were directed against the secondary virus source and not both primary and secondary virus sources. Harvest data collected during 1973 indicated that an increase in plant weight may not occur as a result of virus reduction by oil sprays. The data suggest that repeated applications of oil may bring about a physiological response resulting in an increase in plant weight unrelated to virus reduction.
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