Bark as a supplemental source for wood furnish in particleboard Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/7w62fb48d

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  • Competition for the conventional supply of wood residue utilized by the particleboard industry is increasing. Utilization of low quality residues by the pulp and paper industry, new sawmill and plywood recovery techniques, and the growing practice of converting low quality residues into steam and electrical power have all cut into the conventional wood furnish supply of the particleboard industry. New sources of raw material need to be located if the industry is to maintain its present production volume and product mix. It was hypothesized that previously unused wood residues containing small amounts of bark could supplement the conventional supply (planer shavings, sawdust, and plywood trim) of wood materials utilized in particleboard fabrication if board quality was maintained. An experiment was designed to utilize laboratory fabricated medium density homogeneous particleboard to evaluate the effects of supplementing bark at the rates of 5, 10, and 20 percent (oven dry weight basis) for a standard wood furnish. Three types of bark (Douglas-fir, ponderosa pine, and red alder) were individually substituted and compared to boards fabricated with the standard wood furnish and to each other for significant differences in selected physical properties. Half of the boards were bonded with urea-formaldehyde, while phenol-formaldehyde resin was utilized for the remaining boards. Performance between the three boards was close when compared to each other. Increasing the rate of bark substitution linearly decreased selected strength properties, but had little effect on dimensional stability. On the average, modulus of rupture decreased from 7% to 24%, modulus of elasticity decreased from 4% to 17%, and internal bond decreased from 4% to 21% for the rates of 5% to 20% bark substitution, respectively. Red alder bark substitution enhanced internal bond properties. Performance comparisons between the two resins were not studied.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2010-07-19T16:46:40Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 WisherdKurtDouglas1977Redacted.pdf: 905938 bytes, checksum: 0910c254aef51ddee566957d42313f4c (MD5)

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