Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

The effects of carbonated beverages on arterial oxygen saturation, serum hemoglobin concentration and maximal oxygen consumption Public Deposited

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  • Elite milers, Sir Roger Bannister and Joseph Falcon, have stated that the consumption of carbonated beverages hinders the performance of aerobic events. Oxygen transport is purportedly impaired by the consumption of carbonated beverages. The research on carbonated beverages has been limited to the effects on the digestive system, gastric emptying, and thermal heat stress in animals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of consuming 28 ounces of carbonated beverages per day, for three weeks, on arterial oxygen saturation (Sa0₂), serum hemoglobin concentrations (Hb), and maximal oxygen consumption (VO₂max) in experienced cyclists. Nine competitive cyclists and triathletes (aged 19-24 years, M = 21.67 years), with average weights and percent body fat of 76.51 kg and 11.4 percent respectively, were randomly assigned to a three week period of consuming 28 ounces of carbonated water or a three week period of no carbonated beverages. At the end of each three week period, a 5 c.c. blood sample was taken for Hb determination and the subjects performed a test of maximal oxygen consumption on a cycle ergometer while Sa0₂ was being monitored. The groups then crossed-over with respect to their treatment, and after another three week period, the same variables were measured. The Student's t statistic was used to compare Sa0₂, Hb, and VO₂max. The results showed no significant differences between the carbonated period (C) and the noncarbonated period (NC) in Sa0₂ (94.00 vs 93.22 %, p= 0.21), Hb (13.71 vs 14.12 g/dl, p= 0.11), and VO₂max (4.63 vs 4.65 Imin, p= 0.92). From this study, it appears that the consumption of carbonated beverages does not affect the variables associated with the oxygen carrying capacity of blood (Sa0₂ and Hb) or the test of aerobic performance (V0₂max)
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