Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

Beliefs and practices of secondary supervising teachers concerning Oregon State University student teacher conferences Public Deposited

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  • This study was designed to answer 1. What are the practices of secondary supervising teachers in conferring with their Oregon State University student teachers? 2. What are the beliefs of secondary supervising teachers concerning conferences with Oregon State University student teachers? To obtain answers to the questions of this study a questionnaire was planned, validated and mailed to 193 selected secondary supervising teachers of the following subject matter areas: agriculture, business, English, home economics, industrial education, girls' and boys' physical education, science and social science. No identification of individuals or secondary schools or of subject matter areas was made. Analysis of the information obtained was done in three parts; personal and professional background, the practices, and the beliefs of the respondents. A majority of the 68 men and 57 women respondents expressed positive feelings toward their own student teaching. Over 90 percent have continued teaching in the subject matter area of their student teaching. Sixty percent had master's degrees and most had done academic work at Oregon State University. Three-fourths of these supervising teachers had been teaching for five years or more and nearly half had supervised five or more student teachers. Most Oregon State University student teachers were supervised by teachers who were 25-29 and over 45 years of age. Of these 125 supervising teachers, 92 had no formal preparation for supervision of student teachers. Analysis of data relating to the supervising teachers' practices showed that over half held conferences on an informal daily basis, that they had a positive attitude toward student teacher conferences and that observation notes were used to prepare for conferences. The supervising teacher was usually leader in conferences. Fifty-eight percent said the university supervisor was leader when he visited. This group of 125 supervising teachers believed conferences to be of value for supervision of student teachers. Ninety percent gave conferences the characteristics of a teaching-learning experience which is an exchange of ideas. The effectiveness of a short conference was questioned by 60 percent of the respondents and 50 percent were undecided as to whether or not a conference should be scheduled. Over 68 percent of the respondents believed conferences could have many purposes, but 76 percent were undecided or did not believe the purpose should be stated. Respondents believed conferences necessary and important to guiding student teachers with 90 percent responding negatively to the statement a conference is of little importance in guiding a student teacher. More than 71 percent of the respondents believed conference topics could include a broad range of areas related to guidance of the student teacher and pupil behavior. Seventy-eight percent did not believe a conference should be limited to a specific topic. More than 50 percent of the respondents believed conferences offered growth opportunities to all participants. There was little difference in the beliefs of men and women. Men expressed more indecision regarding their beliefs and women were more sure of their beliefs. Amount of teaching experience did not make a great difference in the beliefs of these supervising teachers.
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