End-of-life caregiving Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/8p58pk032

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  • Over the past decade, changes in health, economic, and social policies haveshifted the dying process out of hospitals and into the community. This exploratory,hypothesis-generating study investigated positive and negative caregiving as well ascare management resources of community-based end-of-life caregivers and how theyrelated to caregivers' personal growth following the death of the care receiver.Retrospective, cross-sectional survey data were collected from 144 respondentsin Lane County, Oregon who reported having provided care for at least one terminallyill person. Data were analyzed using an adapted stress process conceptual framework.Factor analyses determined whether internally consistent measures could be obtainedfrom two new indices related to end-of-life care: a caregiving inventory and a caremanagement resource index. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis examined themediational relationships between care management resources and positive andnegative caregiving in predicting personal growth of end-of-life caregivers followingbereavement.Factor analyses verified that the investigator-developed caregiving inventorywas comprised of two conceptually distinct factors, negative caregiving and positivecaregiving, and the care management resource index was comprised of a single factor,care management resources. Factor scores were generated as a last step in factoranalyses. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was then undertaken with personalgrowth as the dependent variable. Control variables (age, gender, ethnicity, education,income, and level of caregiving) were entered first, the care management factor scorewas entered next, and the positive and negative caregiving factor scores were enteredlast.As predicted, higher levels of care management resources were associated withmore positive caregiving and higher levels of positive caregiving were associated withgreater personal growth. There was no relationship between negative caregiving andpersonal growth, nor was negative caregiving related to care management resources.The regression analysis did not support a mediational model.Results from this study add to the evidence that positive and negative aspectsof caregiving should be treated separately and demonstrate the influence of positiveperceptions of end-of-life caregiving experiences on long-term bereavement outcomes.Findings suggest the value of interventions designed to promote and enhance positiveaspects of the end-of-life caregiving experience.
  • Over the past decade
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  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2008-01-01 (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Nelson_dissertation.pdf: 396210 bytes, checksum: 04a1ea96c9751b51e48e809e89f5e319 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Julie Kurtz(julie.kurtz@oregonstate.edu) on 2007-12-28T17:53:39Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Nelson_dissertation.pdf: 396210 bytes, checksum: 04a1ea96c9751b51e48e809e89f5e319 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Christine Nelson (nelsonch@ohsu.edu) on 2007-12-20T01:10:01Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Nelson_dissertation.pdf: 396210 bytes, checksum: 04a1ea96c9751b51e48e809e89f5e319 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Laura Wilson(laura.wilson@oregonstate.edu) on 2008-01-01 (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Nelson_dissertation.pdf: 396210 bytes, checksum: 04a1ea96c9751b51e48e809e89f5e319 (MD5)

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