A genetic study of the red-band trout (Salmo sp.) Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/8s45qc456

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  • A group of trout that reside in streams of the desiccating lake basins of southeastern Oregon differ markedly from other known Salmo. Known commonly as the red-band trout, this fish was subjected to chromosome analysis for comparison with other species of western North American Salmo. The karyotype of the red-banded trout is 2n = 58 composed of 44 metacentrics, 2 metacentrics with satallites, 2 sub-metacentrics and 10 acrocentrics to give 104 chromosome arms. This karyotype is identical to that of the California golden trout, S. a.guabonita. A similar karyotype has been found, for trout from the Deschutes River and summer-run steelhead from the Siletz and Clearwater rivers. The chromosomal and distributional data is believed to indicate a widespread golden trout complex composed of the red-band trout, the California golden trout, and the Kern River trout inhabiting the Pacific Coast drainage from British Columbia to southern California. In the course of this study, a new karyotype was discovered for the Alvord cutthroat trout of 2n = 64 with 40 metacentrics and 24 acrocentrics to give 104 chromosome arms. Nineteen enzyme systems were analysed by starch-gel electrophoresis in two populations of the red-band trout. The Bridge Creek population displayed very low variability for only malate dehydroge, nase (MDH) and phosphoglucomutase (PGM). No variability was found in the Three-Mile Creek population. A new allele, not previously reported was found for MDH in the Bridge Creek population. The high degree of genetic similarity among and between these populations is thought to be the result of selection pressure rather than stochastic processes. The isolated populations of the red-banded trout appear to be well adapted to their present environment, but without the genetic variability to meet future environmental changes, they may face extinction. Their most immediate threat is man' s use of the environment.
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