Marriage role expectations of college students Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/9880vv37t

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  • This study explored the relationship among marital role expectations, religiosity, and other variables including age, dating status of subjects, living arrangement, marriage plans and parents' marriage. Data were obtained from a sample of 460 Oregon State University students in April, 1976. They were primarily young students, 18 - 19 years old, from many different fields of study, residing in a variety of living situations. Most of the sample came from intact families and the vast majority plan on marrying at sometime during their life. The instruments used to collect data include Dunn's (1960) Marriage Role Expectation Inventory, Faulkner's and DeJong's (1966) Religiosity in Five D Scale, and Hunt and Hunt's (1975) three item measure of religiosity. Four hypotheses were tested: the number of students choosing emergent or traditional marital role expectations, the relationships between marital role expectations and selected background factors, the relationships between religiosity and selected background factors, and the relationship between marital role expectations and religiosity. The following statistical tests were used to test the hypotheses: Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test, linear regression analysis and a t test. The .05 level of significance was used. Significantly more students chose emergent marital role expectations than traditional marital role expectations. The variables dating status, college residence, marriage plans, age and parents' marriage yielded insignificant differences on marital role expectation scores. Sex was the only discriminating background variable. Females scored significantly higher (more emergent) on marital role expectations than males. The relationship between background variables and religiosity was examined. First, using the Five D Scale, no significant differences on religiosity scores were found using the variable parents' marriage. Females scored significantly higher (more religious) than males on the religiosity scale. Engaged students scored significantly higher than any other class of dating status. Those students living together scored significantly lower than any other class of dating status. Those students who were living in a single sex dormitory scored significantly higher on religiosity than any other type of living arrangement. Those students planning on marriage scored significantly higher on the religiosity measure than those students planning to never marry. Those students planning on having three or more children scored significantly higher than any other class, and those students planning no children or only one child, scored significantly lower than any other group. There was a significant positive relationship between religiosity and church attendance. Second, using the Hunt and Hunt measure, no significant differences were found on this measure on the following variables: desired family size, dating status, college residence, marriage plans and parents' marriage. Females scored significantly higher than males on this religiosity measure. A significant postitive relationship was found between religiosity and church attendance. A positive significant relationship was found between the two religiosity measures. A significant negative relationship was found between marital role expectations and religiosity when the Hunt and Hunt scale was used.
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