Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

Preliminary Evaluation of the Balanced-Energy Physical Activity Toolkit. Examination of Teacher-level Implementation Factors with Children's Moderate to Vigorous Physical Activity Behaviors Public Deposited

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  • Classroom-based physical activity (CBPA) breaks are a common and cost-effective physical activity (PA) promotion strategy at elementary schools. Nevertheless, there is limited research examining how teacher-level factors such as value for PA and perceived support to deliver CBPA breaks influence teacher implementation of CBPA breaks. In addition, to date no published studies have examined the association of teacher-level factors with children's PA levels. The research presented in this dissertation narrows the identified gaps in our understanding of CBPA implementation and impacts. We assessed the relationship of teacher-level factors with teacher use of the Balanced Energy, Physical Activity Toolkit (BEPA-Toolkit), a CBPA tool. Additionally, we assessed the relationship of teacher-level factors with children's objectively measured moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) time. To accomplish the primary aims of this dissertation, cross- sectional data were collected in fall 2015 at six rural elementary schools in the State of Oregon. In regards to the first aim of this dissertation, we examined the association of teacher-level factors with teacher's self-reported use of the BEPA-Toolkit. We surveyed 83 elementary school teachers (k-6th grade), of whom 57% reported being BEPA-Toolkit users. Then through a logistic regression we associated seven teacher-level factors with teacher use of the BEPA-Toolkit. Our results indicated that teachers who received training and teachers who reported higher self-efficacy in delivering CBPA breaks with the BEPA-Toolkit, were more likely to report using the BEPA-Toolkit. Specifically, we found that teachers who participated in a training had 6.1 (Confidence Interval [CI] 1.22- 31.44) greater odds of using the BEPA-Toolkit. In addition, teachers who reported higher self-efficacy in implementing the BEPA-Toolkit, had 3.4 greater odds of self-reporting using the BEPA-Toolkit (CI 1.11-10.78). Our second aim was to evaluate the association of teacher-level factors with children's MVPA time. We measured children's (n=1247, grades 1-6th) PA over a 4-day period while simultaneously asking teachers (n=76) to record daily PA opportunities, including their use of the BEPA-Toolkit and any other CBPA tool. We then used linear regression models to associate teacher-level factors and PA opportunities with children's average MVPA time. In this study, our results demonstrated that teacher's value for PA and the provision of physical education (PE) opportunities were positively associated with children's average MVPA. After adjusting for multiple covariates, one standard deviation change in PA value was associated with 0.11 (p<0.001) standard deviation change in children’s MVPA time. Additionally, one standard deviation change in PE time was associated with 0.18 (p<0.001) standard deviation change in children's MVPA time. We observed no relationship between children's MVPA and use of the BEPA-Toolkit. The results of this dissertation highlight the importance of evaluating teacher- level factors to ensure successful long-term implementation of CBPA tools. Although this dissertation provides valuable contributions to the literature, prospective investigations examining causal effects of teacher-level factors on teacher's implementation of CBPA breaks and on children’s PA levels are warranted.
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  • description.provenance : Submitted by Patrick Abi Nader (abinadep@oregonstate.edu) on 2016-05-28T02:03:55Z No. of bitstreams: 1 AbiNaderPatrick2016.pdf: 2190884 bytes, checksum: be06fc394f41e70f4a73c39b54dd3f0a (MD5)
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  • 2017-08-22 to 2018-06-06

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