Development of guidelines for the use of auxiliary personnel in home economics education programs Public Deposited

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  • The purpose of this study was to explore some of the practices of home economics teachers in the use of auxiliary personnel as expressed by city and state supervisors. A second purpose was to discover the beliefs of city and state supervisors regarding the use of auxiliary personnel in home economics programs. A questionnaire was designed and validated to determine these practices and beliefs. Two hundred fifty-nine questionnaires were sent to city and state supervisors. A total of 130 usable questionnaires were returned. The questions proposed for study were: 1. Do you have any auxiliary personnel in the city or state home economics program which you represent? 2. Who are the auxiliary workers being used in home economics classes in your program? 3. How did your program get started? 4. What are the aides doing? 5. What difference do aides make in the total home economics program? 6. What training do the aides have? 7. How are teachers prepared or trained to use aides ? 8. Do you have in your city or state job descriptions for auxiliary workers ? 9. Do you have in your city or state criteria for the hiring of aides ? 10. How do you feel about the concept of teacher aides ? It was assumed that when the results of these questions were tabulated, guidelines for the use of auxiliary personnel in home economics education programs could be developed. Findings Over half (59 percent) of the total number of respondents reported that they did not have auxiliary workers in their programs. Of those programs that did have auxiliary workers over 50 percent indicated that the workers were mostly community residents. Respondents with auxiliary programs indicated that the auxiliary personnel were generally paid and working part time. A little over one third of the programs were started as a result of teacher requests and federal funding. Five categories of activities for auxiliary duties were listed. They were: actual work with students; audio-visual aids; housekeeping; interpreting the program; and secretarial. The respondents were asked to designate how frequently each activity was carried out by the auxiliaries. Most of the programs had auxiliaries who frequently worked with students. Fifty-one percent of the programs had auxiliary workers trained in after school meetings. It could not be determined from the data how the training was conducted or to what extent. About one third of the programs had teachers trained through supervisor-teacher conferences. Again, it could not be determined how the training was conducted or to what extent. Important to note, however, is that nearly one third of the programs had teachers who had no training or preparation for working with aides. The supervisors were asked to indicate how they felt toward particular statements about teacher aide programs. They were given the following choices to indicate their degree of agreement: agreed; had no feeling one way or another; disagreed; undecided or wanted to qualify the statement. Over ninety percent of the respondents agreed that aides should understand how to work with children, that aides should have planning time together with their teachers, and that aides' assignments should grow out of the needs of a given teaching situation. There were three concepts where 50 percent or more of the supervisors disagreed. Those concepts were: it is not necessary for teachers to have training in working with aides; teaching responsibilities require many different levels of skills, all of these must be carried out by the same individual; aides can be a threat with regard to salary increases for the teacher. Supervisors were asked for statements as to what difference aides make in the total home economics program. Most of the responses were brief and in agreement with the literature. In general, they felt that teachers could concentrate more effectively on professional functions when aided. Respondents were also asked if they had job descriptions and criteria for the hiring of aides in their city or state. Although a few supervisors said that they were currently working on developing these items, most of them did not have such descriptions or criteria in their programs. Guidelines After the data were collected and analyzed guidelines for the use of auxiliary personnel in home economics education programs were developed. They were developed in two parts; guidelines for administrators and guidelines for home economics teachers. These guidelines encompass concepts pertaining to aspects of auxiliary personnel programs such as: scope, type of worker, aide training, aide placement, aide qualifications and standards, aide duties, teacher, and teacher training.
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