Yield and quality of cereals for winter silage production Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/9w0325589

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  • A field study was conducted in 1978 and 1979 at two locations near Corvallis, Oregon, to determine the silage yield and quality of 13 fallsown cereal varieties at two nitrogen fertilizer levels in the context of a corn-winter cemal double cropping production system. Data on the yield, crude protein (CP) content, acid and neutral detergent fiber (ADF and NDF) contents were collected on Adair, Casbon and FB 73130 barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) varieties, Amity, Cayuse and Grey winter oats (Avena Sativa L.), Abruzi and Kung rye (Secale cereale L.), S-72, Sel N-91 and VT 75-229 Triticale (Triticum X Secale) and Stephens and Yamhill wheat (Triticum Aestivum L.) varieties. The statistical analysis of the data gave the following results. Dry matter yields ranged on the average from a high of 8327 kg/ha to a low of 4631 ka/ha. Abruzi rye generally yielded the most dry matter. It was followed by Sel N-91 and VT 75-229 Triticales, Kung rye, S-72 Triticale and the wheat varieties. The barley and oats varieties were generally the lowest producers. Crude protein content was within the range of 6,5 to 10.1 percent of the dry matter. It was on the average highest for FB 73130 barley followed by Casbon barley, Stephens wheat, Adair barley, Yamhill wheat and the Triticale varieties. Acid detergent fiber ranged from 30.8 to 46.4 percent of dry matter. The oats varieties had the lowest ADF values, followed by Stephens and Yamhill wheats, FB 73130 and Adair barleys and VT 75-229 Triticale. The average neutral detergent fiber content for the 13 cereal varieties varied from a low of 50.3 to a high of 69.4 percent of D.M. The oats varieties were generally lowest followed by Stephens and Yamhill wheats, FB 73130 barley, VT 75-229 Triticale, Adair barley and Sel N-91 and S-72 Triticales. Covariance analysis indicated that a strong linear relationship existed between the yield and the quality components of the cereal varieties. When CP, ADF and NDF contents were adjusted for the same yield, it was found that the nitrogen fertilizer effect was no longer significant for either ADF or NDF.
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