Parental stereotypes and children's memory for story content Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/b2773z10q

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  • This study examined children's memory for traditional and nontraditional parental behaviors displayed in story content. Subjects were 40 male and 40 female preschool children between the ages of 47 and 60 months. Children were read a story portraying a mother and a father as the main characters. Each character performed a number of traditional and non-traditional behaviors. Immediately and two days following presentation of the story, children were tested for recognition of the traditional and non-traditional behaviors exhibited by mothers and fathers. Also, two days after story presentation, children were administered the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test and a parental stereotype measure. Results of a split plot analysis of variance revealed that preschool children of both sexes displayed selective memory for traditional behaviors performed by parents in stories. Both immediately and two days after story presentation, children remembered significantly more traditional than non-traditional parental behaviors. Moreover, the results of the analyses indicated that children with high and low stereotyped attitudes were not equally susceptible to non-traditional story content. While children with high and low levels of stereotypy showed similar memory for traditional behaviors, children with lower levels of stereotypes remembered significantly more non-traditional maternal and paternal behaviors than did highly stereotyped children. Finally, a repeated measures analysis of variance compared recognition scores on Test 1 and Test 2. The results revealed that, over a period of two days, children remembered more traditional than non-traditional behaviors. While children remembered approximately the same amount of traditional information on Tests 1 and 2, they remembered significantly more nontraditional information on Test 1 than on Test 2. Furthermore, after two days, children showed superior memory for the non-traditional behaviors displayed by mothers as compared to fathers. The current findings were examined from the perspective of the cognitive processing model. This model suggests that individuals use schemata or stereotypes as organizational frameworks for processing information. Therefore, schema-consistent information is likely to be remembered while schema-inconsistent information may be forgotten. Some directions for future research in this area were discussed.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-08-01T16:33:15Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 LindauerShelleyLK1983.pdf: 537268 bytes, checksum: d9f588bb5cde7e18a475aee855034ea9 (MD5)
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