Identification of in-service personnel development needs in career awareness for Portland and Seattle elementary schools Public Deposited

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  • The main objective of this research was to determine the professional in-service development needs of fourth, fifth, and sixth grade teachers in the metropolitan school districts of Portland and Seattle. The primary objectives for conducting this research investigation were as follows: 1. To determine the professional in-service development needs of fourth, fifth and sixth grade elementary teachers in Portland and Seattle public schools. 2. To examine the differences between control teacher groups and experimental teacher groups, and to determine the treatment effect advisory committee members have on elementary teacher decision-making processes. 3. To analyze the differences between teachers located in average and above average income demographic areas and teachers located in poverty or minority income demographic areas for the two cities. There were four subsidiary objectives of the research project and they were as follows: 4. To determine the subsidiary interaction differences between city teacher groups and demographic teacher groups. 5. To analyze the statistical subsidiary interaction differences between city teacher groups and treatment effect groups. 6. To examine the subsidiary interaction differences between demographic teacher groups and treatment effect groups. 7. To determine the subsidiary interaction differences between city teacher groups, demographic teacher groups and the treatment effect groups. Procedures Research data were obtained through the utilization of a Q-Sort Card Deck. This Card Deck was a result of the efforts put forth by a selected Delphi panel; panel members reacted to three rounds of the Delphi technique in determining what need statements should be included in the research project. In all, a total of 84 need statements or dependent variables were presented to the 160 elementary teachers for their reactions. Elementary teachers met in small groups of ten each at various locations in the two cities when reacting to the Card Deck. The last card of the Card Deck provided the respondents an opportunity to rank the top ten priorities they believed to be most important in meeting their professional in-service development needs. A priority matrix revealed the findings of responses to this card. The research project applied the fixed three-way analysis of variance design for the analyses of data and tests of hypotheses. Conclusions The statistical findings of this research project offers the following conclusions: 1. The top twenty priorities should be included in the professional in-service education programs for Portland and Seattle. 2. There appears to be very few differences between the two cities. Out of 84 primary main effects, there were only four rejections. 3. The treatment effect of advisory committees appears to have little influence on the decision-making processes of elementary teachers. 4. There were very few differences between demographic areas in the two cities. Seventy-nine tests of significance were accepted and five were rejected. Implications In view of the findings and conclusions of this study, the following implications are provided. 1. The eight functional areas of career awareness should be considered when planning, developing and implementing career awareness in-service programs; they are as follows: individual self-awareness, economic and social awareness, educational awareness, awareness of careers, decision making abilities, work understanding and job skills, work aptitudes and appreciations, and other areas in career awareness. 2. The top twenty priority needs should be given consideration as a part of in-service education for metropolitan city schools. 3. Additional research needs to be conducted on the effectiveness and influence of advisory committees as a part of the educational environment.
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