The effects of ownership pattern on forest road networks in western Oregon Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_projects/b5644s123

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  • The pattern of ownership imposed on the-forest landscape of Western Oregon defines the boundaries in which differences in jurisdiction, regulation, and land use operate. Road building is controlled by these factors, and in turn has an effect on the cumulative effects of human utilization of the forest. This study examined the differences in road density and slope position between areas with different ownership patterns. Land ownership pattern can vary according to the size, shape, and mixture of parcels in an area. The forested lands of Western Oregon have areas with a unique checkerboard pattern, resulting from Federal land grant programs to help build railroads and settle the area in the late nineteenth century. These lands now have alternating, one square mile ownership parcels, split between public agencies such as the Bureau of Land Management or the United States Forest Service and private timber companies. This study used analysis of variance of road density, stream density and the ratio of the two. A GIS system was used to sample and analyze existing data for BLM and industrial lands, as well as Forest Service and industrial holdings. Tukey ANOVA tests and parametric statistics were used on randomly sampled areas of each ownership type to find out which ownership types were significantly different for total area, and classified by slope position. The large industrial and large BLM parcels were found to be consistently different across most slope positions, with higher road densities found on the industrial lands. The checkerboard of the two was shown to be intermediate between to the two. The large Forest Service and checkerboard area were not consistently different in total density, but they showed difference in the distribution of roads by slope position. These checkerboard areas had more roads in valley areas while the large USFS parcels had higher road densities on ridges.
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