Is the classroom a haven? The effects of students' exposure to violence on teacher practice Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/b5644t838

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  • Millions of children are exposed to various types of violence throughout their school years. American children, by the time they are 18 years old, have seen more than 100,000 acts of violence on television alone. The effect of exposure to violence becomes a part of a child's life experience and thus enters a teacher's classroom. In fact, teachers are often the first person who sees, hears or recognizes the signs that a child has been exposed to violence. However, no studies have addressed how teachers' practice changes in response to children who have been exposed to community violence. Intervention programs for children who have experienced violence first-hand generally take place in a counselor's office, usually after a child has been identified as having experienced some form of domestic violence. Yet teachers have children in their classrooms that see violence on a daily basis. The overarching research question addressed by this study asked, How has children's exposure to violence changed teacher practices in the classroom? Using survey questionnaires for pre-service teachers (N=46), individual interviews for licensed teachers (N=15), and focus groups in two schools (N=18), a descriptive analysis approach was employed to connect previous literature and teachers' reports in order to create a picture of how teachers perceive and respond to the effects of students' exposure to violence and how to better respond. Licensed and pre-service teachers differed in the types of violence they were aware of, including types they believe most affect children's development. Most teachers in the study relied on what felt right when deciding whether or not to respond to possible signs of exposure to violence in their students. Licensed teachers differed in their initial responses to children exposed to violence. Some relied on procedural, school-based interventions such as Second Steps; while others responded by strengthening their relationship with the child. Teachers in the study reported that strategy changes resulting from their experiences with children exposed to violence manifested in changes to classroom management techniques, their personal relationship with children, and incorporation of the school counselor.
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  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2007-10-24T22:36:40Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1Is the Classroom a Haven PDF version.pdf: 647348 bytes, checksum: 1590d9e4241c3afb5272cb5ed15eb5b5 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Laura Wilson(laura.wilson@oregonstate.edu) on 2007-10-24T22:36:38Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1Is the Classroom a Haven PDF version.pdf: 647348 bytes, checksum: 1590d9e4241c3afb5272cb5ed15eb5b5 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Julie Kurtz(julie.kurtz@oregonstate.edu) on 2007-10-16T15:58:52Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1Is the Classroom a Haven PDF version.pdf: 647348 bytes, checksum: 1590d9e4241c3afb5272cb5ed15eb5b5 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by David Hatch (hatchd@onid.orst.edu) on 2007-10-12T02:01:14ZNo. of bitstreams: 1Is the Classroom a Haven PDF version.pdf: 647348 bytes, checksum: 1590d9e4241c3afb5272cb5ed15eb5b5 (MD5)

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