The effect of ration formulation on the subsequent generation of volatile gases and odors from bovine waste Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/bc386n90n

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  • The objective of this study was to determine the effect that ration formulation has on volatilization of gases and offensiveness of the odor associated with the wastes produced from Holstein replacement heifers. Six separate experiments were conducted to study the relationships between different variables on the release of hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, total nitrogenous gases and amines. The rate of hydrogen sulfide evolution was increased as the cereal grain level of supplementation was increased from 50% to 75% of the diet. Ammonia was volatilized at between 1,000 and 10,000 times that of hydrogen sulfide during the initial storage period, but no differences were found between the three levels (25%, 50%, 75%) of the supplementation of the cereal grains. The pH of the mixture of urine and feces obtained from animals maintained on the various grains and levels (25%, 50%, 75%) indicated that there was a difference between the grain sources with milo causing the lowest pH and barley the highest. Amines were found to compose about 0. 11% of the volatile basic nitrogenous gases that were initially volatilized from the waste. There was a positive correlation between the ammonia release and the amine evolution rate. The urine fraction was found to be a major contributor to the amount of ammonia volatilized. The rate of ammonia volatilization was highest during the first five days of storage for the samples containing urine, the rate then declined; the samples containing feces only released less ammonia and the release rate continued to increase as the storage period increased. The results indicated, under anaerobic storage conditions, that urea is rapidly hydrolyzed to form ammonia. The moisture content of the waste samples were negatively correlated with the volatilization of the nitrogenous gases.
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  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome) using Capture Perfect 3.0.82 on a Canon DR-9080C in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Deborah Campbell(deborah.campbell@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-11-20T21:25:06Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 KellemsRichard1976.pdf: 675402 bytes, checksum: 35dc2af0d4b7d1f8d147207a513bea5e (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-11-14T21:22:00Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 KellemsRichard1976.pdf: 675402 bytes, checksum: 35dc2af0d4b7d1f8d147207a513bea5e (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Georgeann Booth (gbscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2013-11-14T20:17:04Z No. of bitstreams: 1 KellemsRichard1976.pdf: 675402 bytes, checksum: 35dc2af0d4b7d1f8d147207a513bea5e (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-11-20T21:25:06Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 KellemsRichard1976.pdf: 675402 bytes, checksum: 35dc2af0d4b7d1f8d147207a513bea5e (MD5) Previous issue date: 1975-10-22

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