An investigation of qualities predictive of future counselor effectiveness Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/bg257h749

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  • Nature of the Phenomenon The primary purpose of this investigation was to determine if the predisposition of counselor candidates on selected factors found to be associated with effective counseling, upon entering a counselor education program, was predictive of effective counselors at the end of that program. Hypotheses Two central hypotheses were conceived to explore the phenomenon of this investigation. The first hypothesis examined post-training effectiveness differences between three groups of master's students in counseling and guidance who functioned (discriminated) at three distinct levels of effectiveness prior to training. The second hypothesis explored pre- to posttest differences within each of the three student groups in terms of effectiveness discriminating ability. Additional secondary hypotheses relating to such factors as undergraduate grade-point average, sex, age, years of prior experience, were generated. Lastly, "personal criteria" supervisor ratings of effectiveness and "prescribed criteria" supervisor ratings of effectiveness were contrasted and subsequently each of these sets of ratings were compared with written inventory indexes of effectiveness. Methods and Procedures The Counseling Situations and Responses Inventory was administered to 30 master's candidates in the Counseling and Guidance Department at Oregon State University during the beginning of fall quarter, 1976. This inventory was adapted from Dr. George M. Gazda's scales measuring the facilitative dimensions in human relations and was developed with the assistance and permission of Dr. Gazda. The sample of 30 master's candidates was composed of 21 females and 9 males and their average age was thirty-two. The instrument consisted of scales to measure the facilitative dimensions of empathy, respect, concreteness, genuineness, self-disclosure, -confrontation, immediacy of relationship, and an encompassing global scale. During spring term, 1977 the Counseling Situations and Responses Inventory was again administered to the 30 students and two types of counselor effectiveness rating froms were completed by their supervisors: one was based on "personal" criteria while the other was based on "prescribed" criteria (the facilitative dimensions). One-way analyses of variance were utilized to test for post-training differences in effectiveness between "low," "average," and "high" pre-training effectiveness groups as well as for post-training group differences in undergraduate grade-point averages, sex, age, years of counseling experience, and the eight (8) selected criteria of effectiveness measured by the inventory. The major outcome of the study, a counselor selection model for future applicants, was developed through the use of stepwise multiple regression analysis, analysis of variance, t tests of significance, a correlation matrix, and ultimately discriminant analysis. The .05 level of significance was chosen for testing all hypotheses although additional information (.01 level) was furnished where applicable. Findings Results of the investigation indicated that the only significant difference which existed at the completion of the training program between the three groups of students was between the pre-training "low" effectiveness group and the pre-training "high" effectiveness group. No significant differences existed between the "low" and "average" groups nor between the "average" and "high" groups at the completion of the study. There were no significant differences between posttraining level of effectiveness and sex, undergraduate grade-point averages, and age. The variables of "concreteness," "genuineness," and "empathy" were shown to be significant predictors of counselor effectiveness with the variable "concreteness" explaining over 37 percent of the variance alone. A counselor selection model was developed through this investigation and an example provided of its usage.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-05-06T22:17:31Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 BrownBrianHale1978.pdf: 1152091 bytes, checksum: 64dd8cb562c3f245b3a9fd041f3e6355 (MD5)
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