The effects of warm and cold water scuba finning on cardiorespiratory responses and energy expenditure Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/bg257h774

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • This study was designed to determine cardiorespiratory and energy expenditure responses elicited by recreational divers while finning at a submaximal intensity (35% max) in cold (18°C) and warm (29°C) water with and without wet suits. Male divers (15) volunteered to participate in five experimental procedures. A maximal graded exercise tethered finning test, two submaximal (30 min.) finning tests in 29°C with and without wet suits, and two submaximal (30 min.) finning tests in 18°C with and without wet suits were performed. The variables measured were: breathing frequency (BF), minute ventilation (V̇[subscript E]), oxygen consumption (V̇0₂) respiratory exchange ratio (RER), heart rate (HR), and core temperature (CT). Caloric expenditure (kcal) was calculated from RER and V̇0₂. A Four-Way ANOVA and repeated measures design was used to analyze the data. A significant (p < 0.05) Two-Way (suit x time) interaction was revealed for BF. A significant (p < 0.01) Three-Way (suit x temp. x time) interaction was revealed for V̇[subscript E], V̇0₂, RER, HR, and CT. An inverse relationship exists between BF and V̇[subscript E] when comparing dives with and without suits. Diving in 18°C with suits elicited higher BF and lower V̇[subscript E] than diving in 29°C without suits. V̇0₂ increased significantly during three of the four dives. Diving without suits elicited higher V̇0₂ values though this was not significant in every case. Diving in a cold environment elicited higher V̇0₂ and V̇[subscript E]. The 18°C dive with suits elicited lower RER responses than the 29°C dives without suits. Cold stress dives elicited higher RERs, when compared to heat stress dives (not significant). HR increased significantly during the four dives. Diving in 18°C with suits produced significantly higher HR's compared to 29°C diving without suits, suggesting that the suits provided adequate heat loss protection. CT significantly increased during three of the four dives. The significant decrease in CT occurred in the 18°C dive without suits. CT rose to a higher degree during the 18°C dive with suits than the 29°C dive without suits. This research will be useful to physiologists, and diving instructors and associations. This study should increase knowledge about scuba diving and help to improve diving education and safety.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Peer Reviewed
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome) using Capture Perfect 3.0.82 on a Canon DR-9080C in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Kim Stowell (ksscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2013-05-03T00:12:19Z No. of bitstreams: 1 ShakeCaronLeeLouise1990.pdf: 1428286 bytes, checksum: 0e3efe0db17d09fb1a5ac377f6996087 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-05-08T15:47:20Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 ShakeCaronLeeLouise1990.pdf: 1428286 bytes, checksum: 0e3efe0db17d09fb1a5ac377f6996087 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-06-26T21:43:11Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 ShakeCaronLeeLouise1990.pdf: 1428286 bytes, checksum: 0e3efe0db17d09fb1a5ac377f6996087 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-06-26T21:43:11Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 ShakeCaronLeeLouise1990.pdf: 1428286 bytes, checksum: 0e3efe0db17d09fb1a5ac377f6996087 (MD5) Previous issue date: 1989-04-05

Relationships

In Administrative Set:
Last modified: 08/09/2017

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Citations:

EndNote | Zotero | Mendeley

Items