Public perceptions of sagebrush ecosystem management : a longitudinal panel study of residents in the Great Basin, 2006-2010 Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/bk128d453

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  • Intact sagebrush communities in the Great Basin are rapidly disappearing due to invasion of non-native plants, large wildfires, and encroachment of pinyon pine and juniper woodlands. Land management options include the use of prescribed fire, grazing, herbicides and mechanical treatments to reduce the potential for wildfire and restore plant communities. Land managers in the region face a complex and interrelated set of ecological, economic, and social challenges to the implementation of these management practices. Effective restoration strategies require consideration of citizens in the region and their acceptance of management practices, as well as their trust in the agencies that implement them. This longitudinal panel study (2006-2010) examines the social acceptability of management options for rangeland restoration and public trust in agencies to carry out these options in three urban and three rural regions of the Great Basin. Most similar studies in this region have been largely place-based and cross-sectional, focusing on communities at one point in time. Results from this study can be used to evaluate the success of management programs, predict support for different treatments, determine the impact of agency outreach efforts, and identify important factors for building trust between communities and agencies across the region. The study uses data from a mail-back questionnaire sent to residents in 2006 and again in 2010. Overall, 698 respondents comprise the panel of interest. Results suggest landscape scale events such as wildfire, as well as agency management and outreach programs, had little influence on respondents' perceptions of agencies or management options over the study period. Several key findings have persisted throughout the study: (1) acceptance is high for the use of prescribed fire, grazing, felling, and mowing, but low for chaining and herbicide use, though there are (2) low levels of public trust and confidence in agencies to implement these management options, and (3) there are salient differences between the region's rural and urban residents with important implications for agency communication strategies. Most changes in response over the study period were subtle, though the direction and strength of these changes highlight noteworthy trends: (1) Great Basin residents are becoming more aware of key threats facing rangelands, (2) they seem more interested in having a role in making management decisions, and (3) they are slightly more positive about their interactions with agency personnel. Finally, findings suggest many residents have had little experience with agency outreach programs. Trust and confidence in management agencies are key factors in garnering support for restoration activities. While knowledge of management activities and confidence in managers' ability to competently implement them certainly play a role, findings strongly suggest sincerity factors (e.g., good communication or the perception that agencies share citizens' goals, thoughts, or values) have the greatest influence on acceptance of management practices in the Great Basin. Results suggest it would be beneficial for agencies to take a more active role in building trust with residents across the region. Differing levels of knowledge and interest, as well as different concerns, found among rural and urban residents highlight the need to tailor outreach strategies for use in specific communities.
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