The effects of plyometrics on neuromuscular control Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/bk128f548

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  • The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of plyometric training on both spinal and supraspinal motor control as well as the rate of torque development (RTD) in healthy active females. Thirty-one subjects were recruited to participate in the study and participated in either the training or control intervention for 6 weeks. All subjects were measured pre- and post-intervention on H:M ratios, paired reflex depression (PRD), recurrent inhibition (RI), and V-waves (V:M ratios) on the soleus muscle. During the PRD and RI measurements, the subjects stood in a double-legged (DL) and single-legged (SL) stance. The H:M ratios were measured only during DL stance. During the V:M ratios measurement, subjects performed plantar flexion isometric contractions on a Biodex dynamometer. For all subjects, RTD was measured for plantar flexion, knee extension, and knee flexion during time windows of 0-50, 0-100, 0-150, 0-200, and 0-250ms and were conducted during an isometric contraction on a Biodex dynamometer. A 2 (Group) X 2 (Session) X 2 (Stance) mixed model ANOVA was used to analyze the PRD and RI data. A 2 (Group) X 2 (Session) mixed model ANOVA was used to analyze the H:M ratios and V:M ratios. A 2 (Group) X 2 (Session) mixed model ANOVA was used to analyze the data. There were no statistically significant differences between groups for all dependent variables (p > 0.05). There was a Session main effect for RI (p = 0.01). There were a Group main effect (p = 0.01) and a Stance main effect (p < 0.01) for PRD. In conclusion, differences were not observed between a plyometric training group and a non-plyometric training group. This suggests that plyometric training does not have an effect on spinal and supraspinal control or on RTD. Overall the neuromuscular variables were not affected by plyometric training. Plyometric training performed in this study was not challenging enough to cause change to the neuromuscular variables selected.
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