Effects of burrowing by mountain beaver (Aplodontia rufa) on soil in a young forest in the Oregon Coast Range Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/bn999877n

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • Soil effects from mountain beaver (Aplodontia rufa ) burrowing were investigated in Oregon Coast Range soils formed from Tyee sandstone. The potential for observed changes in soil to affect productivity was assessed. Soil horizons from mountain beaver mound soil and adjacent unmounded profiles were collected with a monolith-type quantitative sampler. Bulk density, changes in soil depth, soil C (estimated from LOI), Kjeldahl-N, Kjeldahl-P, and Oxalate extractable P and K were measured. Results from these analyses were normalized for differences in organic material by calculating variables as a mass per hectare per fixed weight of ashed soil. This approach combined the advantages of sampling by individual soil horizons, with statistical tools to compare soil profiles with dissimilar horizonal arrangements. Patterns of soil mixing due to mountain beaver, as well as dimensions and arrangement of a single burrow are described. Mountain beaver mixing altered the depth distribution of C, N, and P, increased soil depth, and reduced bulk density. The distribution of gravel in unmounded profiles suggested a history of soil mixing on this site that obscured mixing effects attributable to recent mountain beaver activity. Colluvial action, windthrow, and past animal activity are the most likely causes of background mixing in unmounded profiles. Soil mixing attributed to mountain beavers has the potential to increase site production by increasing soil depth and decreasing bulk density, which can in turn affect moisture holding capacity and rooting depth. Results suggest that mountain-beaver mixing did not change site capital of plant nutrients but altered their distribution within the soil. Potential effects of described changes on short-term and long-term weathering release of plant nutrients is discussed. Mountain beaver mixing resulted in exposure of loose mineral soil on the surface which may increase dry ravel erosion. Thus, burrowing animal activity may represent an important sediment export mechanism from managed stands.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • PDF derivative scanned at 300 ppi (256 B&W, 256 Grayscale), using Capture Perfect 3.0.82, on a Canon DR-9080C. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Digital Production (digitalproduc@gmail.com) on 2009-12-15T21:01:47Z No. of bitstreams: 1 RussellWilliamOgburnIII1997.pdf: 1915361 bytes, checksum: 245223e8970a7c6e19b9f8941e0225b6 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2009-12-17T18:02:27Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 RussellWilliamOgburnIII1997.pdf: 1915361 bytes, checksum: 245223e8970a7c6e19b9f8941e0225b6 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2009-12-17T18:02:27Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 RussellWilliamOgburnIII1997.pdf: 1915361 bytes, checksum: 245223e8970a7c6e19b9f8941e0225b6 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2009-12-17T17:58:15Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 RussellWilliamOgburnIII1997.pdf: 1915361 bytes, checksum: 245223e8970a7c6e19b9f8941e0225b6 (MD5)

Relationships

In Administrative Set:
Last modified: 08/01/2017

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Citations:

EndNote | Zotero | Mendeley

Items