Anaerobic reductive dechlorination of TCE and TCFE in TCE contaminated sediments : enhanced bioremediation and bioaugmentation Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/br86b6705

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • This research focused on the enhanced reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) and its surrogate, trichlorofluoroethene (TCFE), using two bioremediation methods in anaerobic conditions. Two anaerobic bioremediation studies were conducted to investigate the effects of microbial communities in the presence of different electron acceptors and donors during anaerobic reductive dechlorination of TCE and TCFE. The first study was conducted in the groundwater microcosm bottles, filled with groundwater and sediments collected from Richmond site, CA. Parallel reductive dechlorination of TCE and TCFE was evaluated in the presence of fumarate and its product, succinate, while active reduction of high background concentrations of sulfate (2.5 mM) occurred. Because sulfate was assumed as a favorable electron acceptor during reductive dechlorination of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs), all microcosms receiving TCE and TCFE with substrates showed enhanced reductive dechlorination activity and even no substrate addition microcosms generated biotransformation products. From the electron mass balance calculations, more than 87.5% of electrons went to sulfate reduction and less than 10% of available electrons involved in dechlorination after sulfate reductions. After amending varying concentrations of sulfate (0 2.5 mM), no inhibition was found between reductive dechlorination of TCE and sulfate reduction. The result indicated that reductive dechlorination could be directly competed with sulfate reduction for available electrons. The second study investigated the effectiveness of in situ push-pull tests to evaluate bioaugmentation in physical aquifer models (PAMs) using dehalogenating strains to reductively dechlorinate TCE to ethene and TCFE to FE in the TCE contaminated sediments. Complete reduction of TCE to ethene occurred in less than 14 days with repeated additions of TCE (13.0 to 46.0 mg/L) and TCFE (15.0 mg/L) was completely transformed to FE in under 24 days. Increased rate and extent of dechlorination in the bioaugmented PAM compared to the nonaugmented control PAM indicated successful transport of the bioaugmented culture through the PAM. Similar transformation rates and time course of TCE and TCFE also indicated that TCFE was a bioprobe for reductive dechlorination of TCE. TCE and TCFE were transformed to cisdichloroethene (c-DCE) and cis-dichlorofluoroethene (c-DCFE) respectively at two of the three sampling ports after 50 days of incubation in the nonaugmented PAM indicating reductive dechlorination activity of indigenous microorganisms. The results showed that it is possible to increase the rate and extent of reductive dechlorination of TCE and TCFE by bioaugmentation and that push-pull tests are effective tools for detecting and quantifying these processes in situ. The third study focused on numerical modeling of the second study. The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate a simplified method for estimating retardation factors for injected solutes and bioaugmented microorganisms using "pushpull" test injection phase breakthrough curves, (2) to identify whether bioaugmented microorganisms have kept the same transformation capacity of Evanite culture using Michaelis-Menten kinetics by the values provided by Yu et al. (2005) and to verify in situ rates of TCFE reductive dechlorination rates of push-pull tests by numerical modeling, and (3) to investigate a reasonable answer for the nonuniform recovery of ethene and FE during the activity test and the push-pull test. The bioaugmented microorganisms were effectively transported through Hanford sediment. The estimated retardation factor was 1.33. A numerical simulation predicted cell transport in the PAM as far as port 5. This was qualitatively confirmed by cell counts obtained during bioaugmentation but, cells were distributed nonuniformly. The transport test indicated that TCE and TCFE transport was relatively retarded compared to coinjected bromide tracer (retardation factors ranged from 1.33-1.62 for TCE and from 1.44-1.70 for TCFE). The modeling simulation of Michaelis-Menten kinetics for the activity test was well matched for reductive dechlorination rates for TCE and less dechlorinated ethenes using the previous published values of kmax and Ks of chlorinated ethenes by Yu et al. (2005); the model match indicated that the bioaugmented microorganisms kept the same transformation capacity as the original source, Evanite culture (Yu et al., 2005) over 4 months in the PAM. A numerical simulation resulted in the simple first order FE production rate of 1 day' using STOMP code (2002) and the value of FE production rate was in the range of the transformation rates of TCFE during the activity test. The bioaugmented PAM has caused slow loss of injected CAHs during the activity test and the push-pull test.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Committee Member
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome) using ScandAll PRO 1.8.1 on a Fi-6670 in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2010-09-08T21:55:41Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 LeeJaeHyuk2007.pdf: 1214861 bytes, checksum: 8f6f9a7290aa0d73a52fa3b6f80d53f4 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Nitin Mohan (mohanni@onid.orst.edu) on 2010-09-08T18:58:42Z No. of bitstreams: 1 LeeJaeHyuk2007.pdf: 1210840 bytes, checksum: 8d8545128be8b0c37c3c6e5d8981af13 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2010-09-08T21:55:41Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 LeeJaeHyuk2007.pdf: 1214861 bytes, checksum: 8f6f9a7290aa0d73a52fa3b6f80d53f4 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Nitin Mohan (mohanni@onid.orst.edu) on 2010-09-08T21:19:14Z No. of bitstreams: 1 LeeJaeHyuk2007.pdf: 1214861 bytes, checksum: 8f6f9a7290aa0d73a52fa3b6f80d53f4 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Digital Production(digitalproduc@gmail.com) on 2010-09-08T21:24:44Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 LeeJaeHyuk2007.pdf: 1214861 bytes, checksum: 8f6f9a7290aa0d73a52fa3b6f80d53f4 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Rejected by Digital Production(digitalproduc@gmail.com), reason: rotate pg 104 on 2010-09-08T20:51:35Z (GMT)

Relationships

In Administrative Set:
Last modified: 08/14/2017

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Citations:

EndNote | Zotero | Mendeley

Items