A study to identify the animal science technical competencies needed by vocational agriculture instructors Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/bv73c369n

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  • The central purpose of this study was to identify what animal science technical competencies are needed by vocational agriculture instructors and the degree of proficiency they need to perform these selected animal science technical competencies. The following questions were considered: 1. What animal science technical competencies are needed by vocational agriculture instructors? 2. What degree of proficiency is needed by a vocational agriculture instructor in performing selected animal science technical competencies? 3. Is there a difference between states in the animal science technical competencies needed by vocational agriculture instructors or in the proficiency they need to perform these competencies? 4. Is there a difference between vocational agriculture instructors and people in the animal science industry in how they perceive which animal science technical cornpetencies are needed by vocational agriculture instructors? 5. What degree of proficiency do vocational agriculture instructors feel they possess in performing these selected animal science technical competencies? 6. Did the college or university where the Bachelor's Degree was earned have an affect on the degree of proficiency possessed in performing these selected animal science technical competencies? 7. Did the years of teaching experience have an affect on the degree of proficiency possessed in performing these selected animal science technical competencies? 8. Where did vocational agriculture instructors acquire the proficiency to perform these animal science technical competencies? The finding of this study suggests that: Vocational agriculture teachers should have at least some knowledge and skill to perform most of the 130 competencies. There were 30 competencies with a mean score over 4.00 which is high and this shows that a high degree of skill is needed for this competency. There were 92 competencies between 3. 00 and 3. 99 which shows that vocational agriculture teachers should have competency to perform this task. The eight competencies that fell below the 2.99 range are not considered important. The three states were the same for 102 of the competencies with a difference being shown for only 28. This difference was between Oregon and California for 15 competencies, between Oregon and Washington for 10 competencies, Oregon and both California and Washington for two competencies and one competency that could not be tested to find where the difference was. The most variation found in this study was between what instructors felt was important for them to know and what industry felt was important for agriculture instructors to know. Fifty-seven of the competencies were found to be different in this test. The degree of proficiency an agriculture instructor has in performing the 130 competencies was varied. Many instructors felt they needed more skill in each area especially for the more important competencies. The college or university where the instructor earned his Bachelor's Degree had little effect on his ability to perform most of the competencies. Eighteen competencies showed a difference for where the degree was earned. Only 17 competencies showed any effect of years of teaching and the degree of competency an instructor had. The major factor that this study shows is the large number of agriculture instructors that finish a teacher education program without the technical competency in animal science to perform their job. They must take time to learn these skills after they are on the job and this may prevent them from doing the kind of teaching job that they are expected to do by their administration and the community.
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