Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

Master thesis_Yanghuan Bao_March2008.pdf Public Deposited

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https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/c247dx66n

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  • Vegetative propagation allows the amplification of selected genotypes for research, breeding, and commercial planting. However, efficient in vitro regeneration and genetic transformation remains a major obstacle to research and commercial application in many plant species. Our aims are to improve knowledge of gene regulatory circuits important to meristem organization, and to identify genes that might be useful for improving the efficiency of in vitro regeneration. In this thesis, we have approached these goals in two ways. First, we analyzed gene expression during poplar (Populus) regeneration using an AffymetrixGeneChip® array representing over 56,000 poplar transcripts. We have produced a catalog of regulated genes that can be used to inform studies of gene function and biotechnology. Second, we developed a GUS reporter system for monitoring meristem initiation using promoters of poplar homologs to the meristem-active regulatory genes WUSCHEL (WUS) and SHOOTMERISTEMLESS (STM). This provides plant materials whose developmental state can be assayed with improved speed and sensitivity. For the microarray study, we hybridized cDNAs derived from tissues of a female hybrid poplar clone (INRA 717-1 B4, Populus tremula x P. alba) at five sequential time points during organogenesis. Samples were taken from stems prior to callus induction, at 3 days and 5 days after callus induction, and at 3 and 8 days after the start of shoot induction. Approximately 15% of the monitored genes were significantly up-or down-regulated based on both Extraction and Analysis of Differentially Expressed Gene Expression (EDGE) and Linear Models for Microarray Data (LIMMA, FDR<0.01). Of these, over 3,000 genes had a 5-fold or greater change in expression. We found a very strong and rapid change in gene expression at the first time point after callus induction, prior to detectable morphological changes. Subsequent changes in gene expression at later regeneration stages were more than an order of magnitude smaller. A total of 588 transcription factors that were distributed in 45 gene families were differentially regulated. Genes that showed strong differential expression encoded proteins active in auxin and cytokinin signaling, cell division, and plastid development. When compared with data on in vitro callogenesis from root explants in Arabidopsis, 25% (1,260) of up-regulated and 22% (748) of down- regulated genes were in common with the genes that we found regulated in poplar during callus induction. When ~3kb of the 5' flanking regions of close homologs were used to drive expression of the GUSPlus gene, 50 to 60% of the transgenic events showed expression in apical and axillary meristems. However, expression was also common in other organs, including in leaf veins (40% and 46% of WUS and STM transgenic events, respectively) and hydathodes (56% of WUS transgenic events). Histochemical GUS staining of explants during callogenesis and shoot regeneration using in vitro stems as explants showed that expression was detectable prior to visible shoot development, starting 3 to 15 days after explants were placed onto callus inducing medium. Based on microarray gene expression data, a paralog of poplar WUS was detectably up-regulated during shoot initiation, but the other paralog was not. Surprisingly, both paralogs of poplar STM were down-regulated 3- to 6-fold during early callus initiation, a possible consequence of its stronger expression in the secondary meristem (cambium) than in shoot tissues. We identified 15 to 35 copies of cytokinin response regulator binding motifs (ARR1AT) and one copy of the auxin response element (AuxRE) in both promoters. Several of the WUS and STM transgenic events produced should be useful for monitoring the timing and location of meristem development during natural and in vitro shoot regeneration.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Laura Wilson(laura.wilson@oregonstate.edu) on 2008-04-15T23:14:42Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 3 Master thesis_Yanghuan Bao_March2008.pdf: 1787544 bytes, checksum: 9b044777a347b7eb9c3fe7ea0a8de8bf (MD5) Chapter 2 Online supporting materials.zip: 4140965 bytes, checksum: 7e9025fe59a833018e59410b60b1c2ac (MD5) Chapter 3 Online supporting materials.zip: 41578 bytes, checksum: 1fe470739aeee1a98810ec5d9da91df9 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2008-04-15T23:14:42Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 3 Master thesis_Yanghuan Bao_March2008.pdf: 1787544 bytes, checksum: 9b044777a347b7eb9c3fe7ea0a8de8bf (MD5) Chapter 2 Online supporting materials.zip: 4140965 bytes, checksum: 7e9025fe59a833018e59410b60b1c2ac (MD5) Chapter 3 Online supporting materials.zip: 41578 bytes, checksum: 1fe470739aeee1a98810ec5d9da91df9 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Julie Kurtz(julie.kurtz@oregonstate.edu) on 2008-04-14T17:54:38Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 3 Master thesis_Yanghuan Bao_March2008.pdf: 1787544 bytes, checksum: 9b044777a347b7eb9c3fe7ea0a8de8bf (MD5) Chapter 2 Online supporting materials.zip: 4140965 bytes, checksum: 7e9025fe59a833018e59410b60b1c2ac (MD5) Chapter 3 Online supporting materials.zip: 41578 bytes, checksum: 1fe470739aeee1a98810ec5d9da91df9 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Yanghuan Bao (baoy@onid.orst.edu) on 2008-04-10T06:43:02Z No. of bitstreams: 3 Master thesis_Yanghuan Bao_March2008.pdf: 1787544 bytes, checksum: 9b044777a347b7eb9c3fe7ea0a8de8bf (MD5) Chapter 2 Online supporting materials.zip: 4140965 bytes, checksum: 7e9025fe59a833018e59410b60b1c2ac (MD5) Chapter 3 Online supporting materials.zip: 41578 bytes, checksum: 1fe470739aeee1a98810ec5d9da91df9 (MD5)
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