The effect of music in fashion video advertisements on attitude toward apparel brand Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/cc08hj68s

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  • Products as diverse as soda-pop, fashion and automobiles are selling to the tunes of classic and current pop and rock music. The combination of MTV (Music Television), the latest audio-visual technology, and the replacement of movie stars by rock stars as the idols of contemporary youth (Beckett, 1985; Hartman, 1987), are responsible for today's successful marketing-through-music concept. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of music in fashion video advertisements on attitude toward an apparel brand. Specifically, this study investigated the effect of the emotion-arousing quality or capacity of music on attitude toward apparel brand and attitude toward a fashion video advertisement. Congruity Theory (Osgood & Tannenbaum, 1955), prior research on the effect of attitude toward an advertisement on brand attitude, and the persuasive aspect of advertising communication served as the conceptual and theoretical framework for this study. In addition, the emotion arousing quality of music as a persuasive element of advertising communication was applied to the Holbrook and Batra communication model (1987), and served as a model for this study. A pretest-posttest-control group experiment was conducted for this study. The pretest measure consisted of: 1. a measure of attitude toward apparel brand and 2. a measure of the emotion-arousing capacity of music and preference for music. Attitude toward apparel brand and attitude toward music were measured on a seven-point semantic differential scale. The posttest consisted of the same two measures as the pretest as well as a third measure, attitude toward fashion video advertisement. Attitude toward fashion video advertisement was measured on a five-point Likert-type scale. The subjects for this study were recruited from a course in the Department of Apparel, Interiors, and Merchandising at Oregon State University. Fifty-nine students participated in the pretest portion of the study and forty-seven students completed all three phases of the experiment (pretest, exposure to fashion video, and posttest). Subjects ranged in age from 18 to 27 years, with a mean age of 20 years. Factor analysis, one-way analysis of variance, paired t-test, unpaired .t -test, Pearson Correlation, and analysis of covariance were used to analyze the data. As hypothesized, results indicated that attitude toward apparel brand was affected by the type of music associated with an apparel brand in the context of a fashion video advertisement. It was found that an initial neutral attitude toward apparel brand became more positive after an association with emotion-evoking music, and no significant change in attitude toward apparel brand was found exposure to a fashion video advertisement without However, contrary to prediction, it was found after music. that an association between apparel brand and non-emotion-evoking music did not have a negative effect on attitude toward apparel brand. This association resulted in a more positive attitude toward apparel brand. It was also predicted that the type of music used in a fashion video advertisement would affect attitude toward the advertisement. Results indicated that the type of music did not affect attitude toward fashion video advertisement. As predicted a large positive relationship was found to exist between a piece of music's emotion-arousing quality and preference for the music. These findings partially supported the theoretical framework of this study. However, in contrast to the Holbrook and Batra communication model, attitude toward advertisement was not found to be a mediator between advertisement content and attitude toward advertised apparel brand.
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