Relative effective dose risk based on medical diagnostic modalities at the Nebraska Medical Center Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/cn69m621n

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  • The use of medical diagnostic imaging involving ionizing radiation has drastically increased in recent years causing concern about possible long term consequences such as the induction of cancer. Recognizing this recent trend, the Institutional Review Board (IRB) at the Nebraska Medical Center commissioned this study in order to determine effective doses and corresponding lifetime attributable risk of cancer for all diagnostic scans involving ionizing radiation at its facility. The eventual product will be an on-line dose calculator specific only to the Nebraska Medical Center's scanning protocols to be utilized by its physicians, researchers, and patients for education and informed consent policies. In all, 32 conventional X-ray scans, 39 nuclear medicine scans, and over 100 individual Computed Tomography scans were analyzed to determine effective doses using the most current dosimetry data and computer software available at the time of this study. The Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII methodology was then applied for each nuclear medicine and CT scan's effective dose to estimate the Lifetime Attributable Risk (LAR) of developing cancer based on age and gender. Comparisons of effective doses were also made between similar diagnostic scans from Duke University, Radiation Dose Assessment Resource (RADAR), and www.xrayrisk.com. Conventional X-ray effective dose outcomes showed that there was no definitively higher rate of radiation dose between institutions. Nuclear medicine effective doses varied considerably depending on the amount of radiopharmaceutical administered and source of dosimetry information acquired. The computed tomography effective doses from the Nebraska Medical Center had higher values for scan regions that included the torso region with all other scans yielding similar effective doses. Determining medical diagnostic radiation doses can be an intricate, complex method. It is pertinent that each institution wanting an accurate effective dose from their diagnostic scans base their calculations on individual scanning parameters and the most current radiation dosimetry information.
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