The effects of a summer institute for cultural awareness on the measured level of self-actualization of experienced teachers Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/cv43p103d

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • Purpose of the Study The purpose of this investigation was two fold: (1) to determine the effects of a Summer Institute for Cultural Awareness upon the self-actualization of experienced teachers from four separate high schools, and (2) to determine the success of the Summer Institute for Cultural Awareness in terms of participant perception of goal achievement. Design of the Study The population consisted of approximately 450 teachers employed by the Area II portion of Public School District #1 in Portland, Oregon. The original sample consisted of ninety experienced teachers. The final sample consisted of thirty-two control and thirty-two experimental group participants from the four high schools in Area II. The pre-test of the Personal Orientation Inventory (POI) was administered during the pre-session, one week prior to the beginning of the Institute. One week following the Institute the post-test of the Personal Orientation Inventory was administered. The I (Inner-Directed) Scale scores of the POI were used in a two way fixed analysis of covariance with results tested for significance at the .05 level. Descriptive data was gathered on a weekly basis and included goal identification and achievement, critical incidents, systematic self-observation, and action plan design. Findings and Conclusions The investigation was designed to test the following hypotheses: H1 There will be a significant school effect (rejected) H2 There will be a significant group effect (rejected) H3 There will be a significant interaction effect between school and group. (rejected) Because all three hypotheses were rejected for lack of significant statistical support, it must be assumed that the Summer Institute for Cultural Awareness had no significant effect upon the self-actualization of the participants in the study. Further analysis did indicate trends that support the speculation that participants from three of the schools (experimental school-other) were negatively effected when compared with participants from the fourth school (experimental school-A). The data revealed that the institute participants were at a level of self-actualization above the norm on both the pre- and post-tests. Also the trends seem to support the position that the School-A group was more self-actualized than the school-other group. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FURTHER STUDY 1. This investigation covered a time-span of approximately five weeks. Longitudinal studies are recommended that would investigate the teacher's self-actualization while teaching in an actual cross-cultural setting over a longer period of time. 2. Since this study involved a non-random sampling design that found participants self-actualized as a group, it is recommended that a random sampling design be used that would provide for generalization to the larger population. 3. Further research concerning the effect of cross-cultural teaching situations upon self-actualization should be conducted using another comparative instrument. 4. This study chose a specific personality theory to predict behavior. Other predictive data, concerning cross-cultural teachings, should be gathered using other personality theories. 5. Additional research needs to be undertaken to determine the attitudes of experienced teachers who do not participate in cultural awareness inservice programs. (e.g., the control school-other group which indicated non-self-actualizing, identified in this study). 6. It is recommended that further research examine the sub-scales of the POI for possible effect in cross-cultural teaching situations. 7. It is recommended that research continue to examine methods and techniques that seek to change teacher behavioral characteristics to those best suited for cross-cultural teaching (e.g., the Systematic Self Observation technique).
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Committee Member
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Peer Reviewed
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome) using Capture Perfect 3.0.82 on a Canon DR-9080C in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-12-02T18:11:16Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 AyersLawrence1975.pdf: 1686582 bytes, checksum: 7caaee41124213d6ab6ccbfa051349b5 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Georgeann Booth (gbscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2013-11-28T01:25:19Z No. of bitstreams: 1 AyersLawrence1975.pdf: 1686582 bytes, checksum: 7caaee41124213d6ab6ccbfa051349b5 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2014-01-07T19:28:37Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 AyersLawrence1975.pdf: 1686582 bytes, checksum: 7caaee41124213d6ab6ccbfa051349b5 (MD5) Previous issue date: 1975-05-02
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2014-01-07T19:28:37Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 AyersLawrence1975.pdf: 1686582 bytes, checksum: 7caaee41124213d6ab6ccbfa051349b5 (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Last modified

Downloadable Content

Download PDF

Items