Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

Genetic factors that provide adult plant resistance against Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici to wheat cultivar 'Stephens' in a multilocation analysis. Public Deposited

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  • Stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) has been receiving increased attention in the USA since the appearance of more virulent races detected in the past decade. These races caused yield losses even in areas where the disease previously was rarely detected. Host plant resistance is the most cost effective and environmentally friendly means of controlling stripe rust. Deployment of single, major genes for resistance has been compromised due to the genetic variability of the pathogen, emphasizing the need to breed for durable resistance. 'Stephens' wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) has been grown commercially in the Pacific Northwest region of the USA for 30 years and shows resistance to P. striiformis f. sp. tritici "old" and "new" races. The durable resistance of Stephens to stripe rust is believed to be due to a combination of seedling and adult plant resistance genes. Multilocation field trials and molecular genotyping were used to study the genetics of the resistance response in 'Stephens'. Disease severity, based on the percentage of leaf area infected in field plots, was recorded in eight locations: five in 2008 and three in 2009. Locations could be divided into two mega-environments based on time of appearance of disease and QTL identified. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis identified 11 chromosomal regions associated with resistance to stripe rust in the resistant parent ('Stephens') and two regions derived from the susceptible parent ('Platte'). Many QTL locations coincided to those of previous reports. Furthermore, this study suggests that a combination of additive resistance genes acting at different plant stages is responsible for the durable resistance of 'Stephens'. Significant QTL x environment interactions were found, suggesting that specificity to plant stage, race, and/or temperature are responsible for different disease responses.
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