Effects of selected mathematical computer games on achievement and attitude toward mathematics in university entry-level algebra Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/d217qt24s

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • Two mathematical computer games, POE and EQUATIONS, were used to test the effects of games as learning aids in a university entry-level intermediate algebra course. Specifically, this study investigated whether use of these games would significantly increase student achievement in the course and improve student attitude toward mathematics. EQUATIONS is a nonsimulation mathematical game in which the algorithms of dealing with fundamental operations of mathematics are incorporated into the rules of the game. The computer version of EQUATIONS provides an opportunity for the student to play against a computer rather than another student. POE is a computerized strategy game designed to aid the student in learning to use the computer and to learn the rules for EQUATIONS. The hypotheses for this study, in condensed form, stated the following: Mathematical computer games, POE and EQUATIONS, will significantly increase student achievement in the university entry-level intermediate algebra course, will improve student attitude toward mathematics, and will significantly increase student achievement in predetermined specific skill areas. One hundred forty-three students who were enrolled in the large lecture-recitation section of Mth 95: Intermediate Algebra I at Oregon State University, winter term, 1980, were randomly assigned to the four Solomon groups. Following the expected student withdrawal in the first three weeks of classes, 89 students remained. Students in the experimental groups were trained to use the computer and play POE and EQUATIONS in two short training sessions. After playing POE for two weeks, students played EQUATIONS for the remaining six weeks of the term. Students in the two pretest groups were pretested with Dutton's Attitude Scale and one form of the course final examination. All students were posttested with Dutton's Attitude Scale and an equivalent form of the course final examination. Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) scores were available for approximately two-thirds of the sample. The results of the analysis of the achievement posttest scores, after adjustments for initial differences with the achievement pretest scores, indicated the games treatment did not significantly increase student achievement at the .05 level. However, this analysis did suggest a games treatment trend (p=.10). SAT data, obtained for a subset of the sample, provided additional investigation of this apparent trend. Analysis of the achievement posttest scores of the SAT subgroups, after initial adjustments for achievement pretest and SAT scores, indicated the mathematics portion of SAT was a significant (p=.005) predictor of posttest achievement. These data did not support the games treatment trend. Additional descriptive analysis using SAT data, suggested the initial withdrawal of students may have influenced the achievement posttest means. This bias may have created the appearance of a games treatment trend. In conclusion, the data in this study suggested the mathematical computer games, POE and EQUATIONS, did not significantly increase student achievement in this sample at the .05 level. Analysis of subscores from the achievement posttest did not find significant (at the .05 level) increases in student achievement in the predetermined specific skill areas. The results of the analysis of the attitude data showed no significant (at the .05 level) improvement in attitudes toward mathematics. The attitude pretest score was found to be a significant (p=.003) predictor of the attitude posttest score. Investigation of the amount of computer time used per week by students in the treatment groups indicated only 12 of 41 students worked with the computer games more than four weeks. The achievement of these 12 students was highly correlated with their time spent on the computer. These data illustrated the student response in this sample to the games as an additional assignment.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Committee Member
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Peer Reviewed
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome) using ScandAll PRO 1.8.1 on a Fi-6770A in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 5.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Kirsten Clark (kcscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2013-08-21T22:50:31Z No. of bitstreams: 1 MooreMargaretLouise1981.pdf: 1430516 bytes, checksum: 1521934030b9007fb725f51f41bec7eb (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-08-26T20:18:40Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 MooreMargaretLouise1981.pdf: 1430516 bytes, checksum: 1521934030b9007fb725f51f41bec7eb (MD5) Previous issue date: 1980-08-01
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-08-26T20:18:40Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 MooreMargaretLouise1981.pdf: 1430516 bytes, checksum: 1521934030b9007fb725f51f41bec7eb (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-08-22T14:47:44Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 MooreMargaretLouise1981.pdf: 1430516 bytes, checksum: 1521934030b9007fb725f51f41bec7eb (MD5)

Relationships

In Administrative Set:
Last modified: 08/23/2017

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Citations:

EndNote | Zotero | Mendeley

Items