Perceived attractiveness and perceived support of the feminist movement Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/d504rp06w

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  • This study was designed to provide additional information to determine: what difference variance in perceived attractiveness made in perceived support of the feminist movement; what difference type of garment worn made in perceived support of the feminist movement; relationship between the judgments regarding perceived support of the feminist movement and respondents' own attitudes toward the movement; differences in perceived attractiveness of face and person (face plus garment), and of garment and person; whether type of garment worn made a difference in perceived attractiveness; and whether differences existed between the judgments of men and women regarding perceived attractiveness, perceived support of the feminist movement, and attitudes regarding the movement. The 141 respondents represented 81% of the student body of a small liberal arts college. Fifty-four males and 92 females voluntarily participated in the study. Five females not born in the United States were eliminated from the study because of their varied cultural backgrounds. Slides of drawings of three faces varying in attractiveness, two garments (a dress and a pantsuit), and six persons (face and garment combinations) were used to assess perceived attractiveness and perceived support of the feminist movement. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire. The paired t-test was used to test differences between means of paired variables; the Product Moment Correlation Coefficient was used to test the relationship between scores on perceived support of the feminist movement and attitudes toward the feminist movement; and the t-test was used to test the differences between means for men and women. The less attractive the face, the more supportive the face was perceived to be of the feminist movement. A person was perceived significantly more supportive of the feminist movement when wearing the pantsuit than when wearing the dress. Judgments regarding perceived support of the feminist movement were not related to respondents' own attitudes about the movement. Perceptions regarding perceived support of the feminist movement and garment worn varied by sex. Women rated the person wearing the pantsuit significantly more supportive of the feminist movement than did men, and women rated the person wearing the dress significantly less supportive of the feminist movement than did the men. Apparently garment worn had more meaning for women than for men regarding perceived support of the feminist movement. However, there was no difference between men and women regarding their attitude toward the feminist movement. Persons were perceived to be more attractive than faces only. The garment had a greater impact on perceived attractiveness for persons with average and below average face, garment was perceived as more attractive than person, but the person with above average face was perceived as more attractive than the garments. No relationship was found between perceived attractiveness and type of garment worn. Also, there was no significant difference between men and women regarding perceived attractiveness of faces and persons; however, the pantsuit was perceived significantly more attractive by the women than by the men. Findings that variance in perceived attractiveness and type of garment worn had an influence on perceived support of the feminist movement, that persons were perceived more attractive than faces only, and that type of garment worn had no effect on perceived attractiveness should be of value in understanding behavior related to clothing and appearance.
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