Experimental combustion analysis and development of representative fuel specifications for selected wood and refuse derived fuel pellets from the Pacific Northwest Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/d504rp45k

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  • An experimental biomass combustion facility has been built and established at Oregon State University. The furnace, or Biomass Combustion Unit ( BCU ), uses an augertype fuel feed system, grate-type fuel support with under and over fire air supply. Fourteen pellet species from five States - Alaska, Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana were analyzed for a large number of physical and chemical variables. These variables included higher heating value, moisture content, ultimate analysis, etc. Three separate combustion experiments were conducted using nine of the available fourteen wood pellets. The overall objective was to simply burn wood biomass pellets under "reasonable" operating conditions and report the relative combustion performance of each fuel. More specifically, the three combustion experiments coupled with the pellet analysis data supported the following conclusions : 1. It was possible to construct a simple mathematical model describing the simultaneous effects of under fire air and over fire air on pellet efficiency performance. The model was used to predict the optimal firing conditions based on thermal efficiency. It is hypothesized that the model is broadly ( but approximately ) applicable to all fourteen pellet species examined in this report. 2. Tests indicate that all nine of the relatively diverse wood pellet fuels behave similarly under similar operating conditions. 3. Carbon monoxide and oxides of nitrogen never reached mean values of over 215 parts per million for all experiments. 4. Fuel-bound salt was found to cause relatively large particulate fly ash and opacity readings and resulted in the only slag formation. 5. Increasing under fire air temperature by 230 deg.F on average yielded a statistically significant ( but small ) increase in mean combustion gas temperature. There was not a statistically significant effect on combustion efficiency as measured by carbon dioxide concentration in the exhaust gases.
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