Effects of forage quality and type of protein supplement on intake and digestibility in beef steers and performance of postpartum beef cows Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/d791sj32h

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of forage quality and supplemental undegradable intake protein (UIP) level on intake, digestibility, and performance of beef cattle. In Exp. 1, five ruminally cannulated steers (BW = 456 ± 6 kg) were used in a 6 x 5 incomplete Latin square with treatments in a 2 x 2 factorial plus two controls. Factors were hay quality, moderate (M, 8.0% CP, 62.1% NDF) and low (L, 4.0% CP, 8 1.5% NDF), and supplement type, high UIP (HUIP, 60% UIP, 48% CP) and low UIP (LUIP, 40% UIP, 49% CP). Supplement was provided daily to meet 100% of CP requirements. Intake and total fecal output were measured on days 15 to 19 and total rumen evacuations were performed on d 21. Steers consuming M forage had greater (P ≤ 0.07) DMI, DM digestibility, NDF intake, CP intake, CP digestibility, and particulate turnover rate, while decreasing (P ≤ 0.07) NDF fill, liquid fill, rumen volume @rior to feeding), insoluable acid detergent fiber (TADF) fill, and particulate passage rate compared to steers consuming L forage. Supplementation increased (P ≤ 0.01) DM intake and digestibility and NDF intake in steers fed L forage. An interaction (P = 0.10) occurred for NDF intake. In steers fed L forage, NDF intake was greater with HUIP supplement (5.7 kg/d) than with LUIP supplement (5.2 kg/d), but in steers fed M forage NDF intake did not differ (6.7 vs. 6.8 kg/d, respectively). In Exp. 2, 96 postpartum multiparous cows (BW 555 ± 8 kg) were blocked by calving date and assigned to treatments in a 2 x 2 x 2 factorial arrangement within a split plot design. The additional treatment factor in Exp. 2 was two levels of supplement intake with low and high representing 100 or 120% of CP requirements, respectively. The low quality hay was (L) 6.3% CP and 76% NDF, whereas moderate quality hay (M) was 8.6% CP and 69% NDF. Supplements were fed three times weekly to groups of four cows from calving to breeding. Cow BW and body condition score (BCS) were taken at calving, end of supplementation, and end of breeding. Cvclicity was determined prior to breeding, pregnancy was evaluated at weaning, and calving interval was based upon 2002 and 2003 calving dates. Calves were weighed at birth, the end of the supplementation period, and the end of breeding. Body weight loss from calving to the end of the supplementation period was decreased (P < 0.10) in cows on the high supplement intake level and HUIP supplement compared to cows on the low supplement intake level and LUIP supplement. Body condition loss from calving to the end of the supplementation period was decreased (P < 0.01) in cows on the high supplement intake level compared to the low supplement intake level. A supplement type by supplement intake level interaction (P < 0. 10) was detected for cow BCS change from calving to the end of supplementation. When HUIP supplement was fed, increasing supplemental intake decreased body condition loss, from calving to breeding, more than when LUIP supplement was fed. Calves from cows fed the M forage weighed more (P < 0.10) than calves from cows fed the L forage at the end of the supplementation period. Cow cyclicity prior to breeding, was lower (P = 0.03) with cows consuming L forage compared cows consuming M forage. Cow pregnancy rate at weaning was not effected by treatment (chi-square = 0.59). Calving interval was influenced (P ≤ 0.01) by an interaction of forage type, supplement type, and supplement intake level. On the M forage, there were no differences between treatments, but with cows consuming L forage, the high supplement intake level improved calving interval with the HUIP supplement, but at the low supplement intake level calving interval was shortened by the LUIP supplement. These results indicate that forage quality affects the response of cattle to protein supplementation. Low quality forages respond to supplementation with increases in intake and digestibility. It also appears that UIP may be more advantageous than degradable intake protein (DIP) for steers on low-quality forage through increased intake.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Peer Reviewed
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome) using ScandAll PRO 1.8.1 on a Fi-6670 in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2011-08-15T15:00:49Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1WhiteJennyJ2004.pdf: 718530 bytes, checksum: 6ecdea2e0d531ee04c603157466245a8 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2003-07-24
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2011-08-09T21:17:53Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1WhiteJennyJ2004.pdf: 718530 bytes, checksum: 6ecdea2e0d531ee04c603157466245a8 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Tamera Ontko (toscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2011-08-04T18:58:07ZNo. of bitstreams: 1WhiteJennyJ2004.pdf: 718530 bytes, checksum: 6ecdea2e0d531ee04c603157466245a8 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2011-08-15T15:00:49Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1WhiteJennyJ2004.pdf: 718530 bytes, checksum: 6ecdea2e0d531ee04c603157466245a8 (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Last modified

Downloadable Content

Download PDF

Items