Pollination and pollinators of pumpkin and squash (Cucurbita maxima Duchesne) grown for seed production in the Willamette Valley of western Oregon Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/db78tf34k

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • 'Golden Delicious' winter squash (GDWS), Cucurbita maxima Duchesne, provides significant amounts of pollen (24 mg) and nectar (236 μl), but with a low reward of 14% nectar sugar. The quantity of nectar produced per GDWS flower differed between sites and floral sex. The GDWS male flowers had 25% higher sugar concentration than female flowers. There was no statistical difference in the percent of nectar sugars per flower between sites, but the interaction between site and floral sex was statistically significant for the amount of nectar and percent of nectar sugars. Pollen production per flower differed significantly between sites with the most productive site producing 27% more, and 45% more than the other sites. Pollination efficiency of honeybees and bumble bees was assessed with field cages (1.8x1.8x1.8 m). No significant differences were found except for the interaction between the bee treatment and year on number of fruit per cage. This significant difference reflects the increase in fruit number produced by honey bees in 1997. The effect of distance from honey bee hives on fruit and seed quality was tested, and found significant only for B- and C-seeds weight, which were both less in the plots farthest from the nearest group of honey bee hives. Placement of honey bee hives in fields of ≤120 ha appears not to be critical for adequate pollination of GDWS. Other pollinators (excluding honey bees) were frequent visitors to the squash flowers studied here - for example, Bombus spp., Megachilids, Halictids, etc. These other pollinators, mostly bumble bees, accounted for 3.55% of all bee visits. Honey bees visited proportionately more female flowers in the morning, and progressively switched to the more abundant male flowers in the afternoon. This bias differed by site and year. Bumble bees visited proportionally slightly more male GDWS flowers than did female flowers and did it in a similar rate throughout the day. From 15 minute observations each hour of individual female GDWS flower, we calculated that they received approximately 80 honey bee visits per day.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Committee Member
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Peer Reviewed
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome, 256 Grayscale) using Capture Perfect 3.0 on a Canon DR-9050C in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-08-24T19:22:24Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 GavilanezSloneJennyM2001.pdf: 1590168 bytes, checksum: 2200f70fc366012fbb84110e5cff207d (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Kirsten Clark (kcscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2012-08-23T22:33:27Z No. of bitstreams: 1 GavilanezSloneJennyM2001.pdf: 1590168 bytes, checksum: 2200f70fc366012fbb84110e5cff207d (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2012-08-24T19:22:24Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 GavilanezSloneJennyM2001.pdf: 1590168 bytes, checksum: 2200f70fc366012fbb84110e5cff207d (MD5) Previous issue date: 2000-08-29
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-08-24T19:18:32Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 GavilanezSloneJennyM2001.pdf: 1590168 bytes, checksum: 2200f70fc366012fbb84110e5cff207d (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Last modified

Downloadable Content

Download PDF

Items