Disposal of municipal wastes on sandy soil : effect on plant nutrient uptake Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/db78tg34s

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • Solid municipal waste was applied to Sagehill sand at rates of 0, 100, 200, and 400 tons/acre (0, 67, 133, and 267 tons dry matter). Sewage sludge (2% solids) was applied at 55 gallons per ton of solid waste. Hyslop winter wheat was planted as a cover crop in October 1971 and followed by spring-seeded Fawn fescue and Sernac alfalfa. Ammonium sulfate fertilizer was applied and the plots were irrigated for two crop seasons. The solid waste decomposed rapidly, with only plastic, rubber, and rusted metal remaining on the plots by the end of the first growing season. The soil bulk density decreased with the addition of solid waste, while the organic matter content and moisture retention increased. Effective wind erosion control was obtained with all solid waste applications. Alfalfa and fescue yields of 5 to 6 tons/acre were produced during the first growing season with solid waste treatments of 0, 100, and 200 tons/acre; yields were reduced when 400 tons solid waste were applied. The maximum alfalfa and fescue yields were obtained with the addition of 400 lb N/acre and 1000 lb N/acre, respectively. Higher nitrogen applications decreased fescue yields due to increased soil acidity and consequent increased Mn and Zn uptake. Invasion by weeds decreased yields on plots which received inadequate irrigation early in the season. Plant content of N, P, S, Ca, Mg, K, Fe, and Cu was not affected by the waste treatments. Mn and Zn uptake by wheat, fescue, and alfalfa increased with waste addition and with nitrogen fertilization. Zn uptake from the soil with 400 tons solid waste per acre approached excessive levels (over 200 ppm) during the first season. B uptake by wheat and fescue reached toxic levels while B uptake by alfalfa increased only slightly. Mo uptake by alfalfa grown with the higher waste treatments reached levels potentially hazardous to livestock during the first growing season, but decreased to normal the second year. Co and Cr uptake by alfalfa and fescue was affected very little by the waste additions. Soil pH decreased slightly with waste application and appreciably with nitrogen fertilization. Soil Na content exceeded 3 me/ 100g early in the season in the soils which received 400 tons solid waste per acre, but decreased rapidly as Na was leached with irrigation water. Levels of extractable soil Fe and Cu increased 50-fold with the highest waste treatment, while the extractable soil Zn increased 1000-fold. But soil levels of Fe, Cu, and Zn were not excessive with the lower waste treatments, and decreased to acceptable levels in all the soils within the first growing season. Soil B content increased up to 60-fold with the addition of solid waste. The B remained soluble in the soil and followed water movement patterns. The hot water extractable B decreased to 0.8 ppm or less within the first season in the soil with the lower waste treatments, but remained greater than 2 ppm after two years in the soils which received 400 tons solid waste per acre. Crop production on Sagehill sand after the incorporation of up to 200 tons solid waste per acre appeared feasible with a borontolerant crop such as alfalfa and with irrigation adequate to meet crop needs. Higher rates of solid waste application decreased yields and added hazardous amounts of Zn, B, Na, and Mo to the soil.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Peer Reviewed
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome) using ScandAll PRO 1.8.1 on a Fi-6770A in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 5.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Kirsten Clark(kcscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2013-12-31T20:00:23Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 CottrellNancyM1975.pdf: 1270594 bytes, checksum: 2106f23d491d2fbdbc7424a22227b0fb (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-12-05T22:58:10Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 CottrellNancyM1975.pdf: 1270594 bytes, checksum: 2106f23d491d2fbdbc7424a22227b0fb (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Madison Medley (mmscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2013-12-05T21:23:22Z No. of bitstreams: 1 CottrellNancyM1975.pdf: 1270594 bytes, checksum: 2106f23d491d2fbdbc7424a22227b0fb (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-12-31T20:00:23Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 CottrellNancyM1975.pdf: 1270594 bytes, checksum: 2106f23d491d2fbdbc7424a22227b0fb (MD5) Previous issue date: 1975-03-07

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Last modified

Downloadable Content

Download PDF

Items