Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

Design considerations for a miniature atmospheric engine with a magnet-actuated autonomously-reciprocating in-cylinder regenerator for portable power production Public Deposited

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  • Driven by the need for high energy-density power sources, demand has stimulated the development of small-scale engines. A small-scale engine with a fuel supply could replace batteries and utilize higher energy-density liquid hydrocarbon fuels; such an advance could deliver a new age of portable devices. Currently, operable small-scale engines exist; yet their efficiencies are poor. One possible alternative for improving efficiency is the incorporation of thermal regeneration. This thesis develops a concept for an efficient miniature reciprocating engine for portable power production that is based upon the regenerated atmospheric cycle and uses a magnet-actuated in-cylinder regenerator. As part of the development of the proposed engine, a dynamic model of the regenerator was developed concurrently with an engine simulator. The dynamic model was validated using the engine simulator and can now be used to develop a model to study the thermal aspects of regeneration. The engine simulator was also used to study a unique lubrication-free low-friction piston-cylinder set that utilizes a graphite-glass clearance seal. The piston cylinder set was subjected to several pressure tests, including one with a 26 h duration. It was found that with the addition of aspiration slots, the piston cylinder set with the engine simulator operating at 1800 rpm could reach a peak pressure of approximately 370 kPa with a pressure ratio of approximately 4.2. For the 26 h long-duration test, it was found that the graphite piston did not show any significant wear. However, elastomer cups that were part the ball-joint supports for the piston did exhibit wear that lead to a decrease in peak cycle pressure with time.
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  • description.provenance : Submitted by David Yarger (yargerd@onid.orst.edu) on 2007-08-24 No. of bitstreams: 1 Yarger Thesis.pdf: 4955633 bytes, checksum: f1a6ac2491ca37dfc6a963f9cd7d9cf8 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Linda Kathman(linda.kathman@oregonstate.edu) on 2007-08-29T15:44:41Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Yarger Thesis.pdf: 4955633 bytes, checksum: f1a6ac2491ca37dfc6a963f9cd7d9cf8 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Julie Kurtz(julie.kurtz@oregonstate.edu) on 2007-08-24T16:44:08Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Yarger Thesis.pdf: 4955633 bytes, checksum: f1a6ac2491ca37dfc6a963f9cd7d9cf8 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2007-08-29T15:44:43Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Yarger Thesis.pdf: 4955633 bytes, checksum: f1a6ac2491ca37dfc6a963f9cd7d9cf8 (MD5)

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