Citizen-agency interactions : an investigation of postfire environments Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/dr26z128p

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • Wildfire management has grown increasingly complex in recent years, particularly in the West and in the Wildland-Urban Interface (WUI) where a steady population growth has resulted in greater risk to people and property. Recent trends suggest the process of recovering from large fires (>100,000 acres) will become increasingly important to forest agencies and communities (National Interagency Fire Center 2007). However, many forest management personnel are ill prepared to cope with the ecological planning and public interactions that follow such events. Agency personnel are called on to make technical decisions regarding fire management and restoration, communicate current and reliable information to community members, and include them in postfire planning (McCool et al. 2006, Taylor et al. 2005). Such circumstances can result in conflicts over management actions that play out in the public arena. Until recently, little research had been conducted in postfire environments. This dissertation helps close that gap by examining citizen-agency interactions in postfire settings. Findings are presented in three manuscripts. The first manuscript synthesizes literature from postfire and related contexts to identify themes associated with citizen-agency interactions that may be useful to managers in postfire settings. Findings suggest interactions are key to citizen trust, acceptance, and overall success of bringing communities together to agree on a course of action. The second manuscript evaluates interviews about postfire communication from citizens and agency personnel in five postfire settings in the western U.S. Results highlight the complexity of communication, and the important role it can play in building trusting relationships. These findings also offer several suggestions for managers faced with planning public outreach in a postfire context. The third manuscript examines survey results from two postfire settings in Oregon. Findings suggest an agency's commitment to long-term interactions with citizens influences citizen trust in the agencies and acceptance of postfire management strategies. There is broad support for postfire management activities (i.e., erosion control, seeding, replanting), though acceptance is dependent on trustworthy relations. Findings from this research indicate that positive citizen-agency relations will need to be developed before a fire occurs if postfire actions are to be timely and supported by local communities.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Committee Member
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Keyword
Subject
Rights Statement
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Julie Kurtz(julie.kurtz@oregonstate.edu) on 2008-05-08T19:38:16Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Olsen_dissertation.pdf: 601706 bytes, checksum: 4a72e639ad9f29564ca87ef6e5d5f19b (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Laura Wilson(laura.wilson@oregonstate.edu) on 2008-05-15T16:03:16Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Olsen_dissertation.pdf: 601706 bytes, checksum: 4a72e639ad9f29564ca87ef6e5d5f19b (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2008-05-15T16:03:16Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Olsen_dissertation.pdf: 601706 bytes, checksum: 4a72e639ad9f29564ca87ef6e5d5f19b (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Christine Olsen (olsench@onid.orst.edu) on 2008-05-08T01:31:30Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Olsen_dissertation.pdf: 601706 bytes, checksum: 4a72e639ad9f29564ca87ef6e5d5f19b (MD5)

Relationships

In Administrative Set:
Last modified: 08/14/2017

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Citations:

EndNote | Zotero | Mendeley

Items